4.COM 15B

The Committee,

  1. Having examined document ITH/09/4.COM/CONF.209/15, its annexes and its addendum;
  2. Recalling Article 18 of the Convention;
  3. Also recalling Chapter 4 of the Operational Directives relating to programmes, projects and activities best reflecting the principals and objectives of the Convention;
  4. Thanks the working group for its examination, its opinions, and its summary recommendation;
  5. Congratulates the five States Parties that have submitted proposals for programmes, projects and activities for the safeguarding of the intangible cultural heritage;
  6. Adopts the summary recommendations of the working group, as annexed to this Decision;
  7. Selects the following programmes, projects and activities as best reflecting the principals and objectives of the Convention :

Bolivia, Chile, Peru: ‘Safeguarding intangible cultural heritage of Aymara communities in Bolivia, Chile and Peru’;

Indonesia: ‘Education and training in Indonesian Batik cultural heritage for elementary, junior, senior, vocational high school and polytechnic students in collaboration with Batik Museum in Pekalongan’;

Spain: ‘Centre for traditional culture – school museum of Pusol pedagogic project’.

  1. Requests the Secretariat to promote the selected programmes, projects and activities;
  2. Invites States Parties to submit proposals for programmes, projects and activities in conformity with Chapter 4 of the Operational Directives.

Annex

Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Chile, Peru:
Safeguarding intangible cultural heritage of Aymara communities in
Bolivia, Chile and Peru

Abstract

The proposed sub-regional project aims at developing safeguarding measures to ensure the viability of the oral expressions, music and traditional knowledge (textile art and agricultural practices) of the Aymara communities of Bolivia (La Paz-Oruro-Potosí), Chile (Tarapacá-Arica-Parinacota-Antofagasta) and Peru (Tacna-Puno-Moquegua). The activities, planned for implementation over the course of a five-year project, are: (a) identifying and inventorying the traditional knowledge and oral traditions of Aymara communities in the selected areas, (b) strengthening language as a vehicle for transmission of the intangible cultural heritage through formal and non-formal education, (c) promoting and disseminating Aymara oral and musical expressions and (d) reinforcing traditional knowledge related to the production of textile arts and traditional agricultural techniques. These four lines of action of the planned project have been established as priorities by the Aymara communities in the different phases of consultation and preparation of the project and they will be implemented with the full involvement of the communities, guided by the 2003 Convention’s principles. The project intends to adopt as its working strategy the creation of a subregional and international network comprising individuals, communities, groups, cultural managers, specialists, indigenous organizations, research centres, NGOs and Governments, to promote the exchange of experience, information and training in order to strengthen capacities in the region.

Opinion of the merits of the proposal

Having examined the proposal of Bolivia, Chile and Peru (file reference number 00299), the working group is of the opinion that the project involves safeguarding of intangible cultural heritage in the form of (a) identification, research and documentation (b) strengthening transmission of the intangible cultural heritage through formal and non-formal education, (c) promoting and disseminating oral and musical expressions and (d) reinforcing traditional knowledge regarding agricultural practices. The project promotes the coordination of efforts for safeguarding ICH on a subregional level by including local Aymara communities in three neighbouring countries: Bolivia, Chile and Peru. It reflects the principles and objectives of the Convention by including safeguarding as defined in the Convention, notably awareness-raising and international cooperation. The effectiveness of the programme is demonstrated by its systematic and logical action plan, the documented consent of the participants of the respective communities and the joint governmental and international support.

The participation of the community is evident from the Action Plan and the enclosed documents; their free, prior and informed consent has been amply demonstrated by the declarations of local NGOs regarding their willingness to take part. The project is an interesting example of subregional cooperation among local communities, governmental bodies and NGOs, and it can serve as a model for similar projects on a subregional level. Local communities, States and the implementing bodies are willing to share their experiences in the dissemination of best practices, as demonstrated in the proposal. The project has well-defined action plans that are measurable and assessable, and is applicable to the particular needs of developing countries, as many developing countries have conditions similar to the ones described in the project.

Summary recommendation

The working group recommends that the Committee select this project for promotion as best reflecting the principles and objectives of the Convention.

 


Indonesia

Education and training in Indonesian Batik cultural heritage for
elementary, junior, senior, vocational high school and polytechnic students
in collaboration with Batik Museum in Pekalongan

Abstract

Indonesian Batik is a traditional hand-crafted dye-resist textile rich in intangible cultural values, passed down for generations in Java and elsewhere since the early nineteenth century. The batik community noted the younger generation’s interest in batik was waning, and felt the need to increase efforts to transmit batik cultural heritage to guarantee its safeguarding. The main objective of the programme is therefore to increase the awareness and appreciation of the cultural heritage of Indonesian batik, including its history, cultural values and traditional skills, among the younger generation. Law No. 20 of 2003 makes it possible to include batik culture in curricula as ‘local content’ in areas having batik cultural heritage, such as Pekalongan City. The Batik Museum initiated the programme in 2005, in close cooperation with the educational authorities of the city, and it continues to expand to Pekalongan District and neighbouring Batang, Pemalang and Tegal districts. This programme, whose effectiveness has been demonstrated through evaluations, constitutes an effort to (a) safeguard intangible cultural heritage by ensuring its transmission to the next generation, (b) ensure respect for the intangible cultural heritage by giving Indonesian Batik a respectable place as local content within the curricula of various strata of formal education, beginning from elementary, junior, senior and vocational schools up to polytechnic, and (c) raise awareness of the importance of intangible cultural heritage at the local, national and hopefully international level.

Opinion of the merits of the proposal

Having examined the proposal of Indonesia (file reference number 00318), the working group is of the opinion that the project involves safeguarding of intangible cultural heritage, focusing on transmission and dissemination of knowledge, raising awareness and reinforcing traditional culture in the framework of education. The programme promotes coordination of efforts on the national level, concentrating on Pekalongan city and its surroundings. It reflects the primary objectives of the Convention by strengthening trans-generational transmission of traditional handicrafts. The effectiveness of the programme for increasing awareness and appreciation of Indonesian batik as cultural heritage is demonstrated in the enclosed documents. Taking advantage of the Indonesian legal framework that provides for the inclusion of local content in school curricula, the programme promotes interest among young people and encourages them to become practitioners of intangible cultural heritage. The participation of the community is evident from the ‘Statements of participation and agreement of the community’ enclosed with the proposal, and has been demonstrated through the involvement of the headmasters, teachers and schoolchildren.

The programme represents a good example for safeguarding activities of one geographical region, within a national framework, and can serve as a model for similar programmes. It exemplifies how to ensure the viability of elements of local cultural heritage by including them in formal and non-formal education, in close cooperation with a local museum. The willingness of the participants (the State Party, local authorities and institutions, together with the local community) to cooperate in the dissemination of their practices is declared in the ‘Statements of participation and agreement of the community’. The results and outputs of the programme are measurable on the basis of the quantitative data given in the proposal. The approach adopted in the programme is very suitable for developing countries, particularly those in Asia; the teaching of traditional batik skills not only gives a sense of pride to the younger generation but also promotes economic empowerment.

Summary recommendation

The working group recommends that the Committee select this programme for promotion as best reflecting the principles and objectives of the Convention.

 


Spain

Centre for traditional culture – school museum of Pusol pedagogic project

Abstract

This innovative education project has two overall goals: to promote value-based education by integrating the local cultural and natural heritage within the curriculum, and to contribute to the preservation of Elche’s heritage by means of education, training, direct action and awareness-raising in the educational community. Implemented at the one-teacher rural public school of Pusol (Elche, Spain) in 1968, the project has successfully integrated heritage into formal education. Guided by teachers and external collaborators, children explore, in a play atmosphere, the rich Elche heritage in contact with tradition bearers, and contribute directly to its preservation. The children do fieldwork data collection, museography, and teach one another and visitors about heritage, studying and exploring the heritage by themselves. The project has trained almost 500 schoolchildren and has resulted in a school museum with more than 61,000 inventory entries and 770 oral files, preserving everyday life heritage and promoting the cultural mapping of local heritage resources. Between 1968 and the mid 1980s, the project remained within the boundaries of the rural district of Pusol, where the school was based. But as knowledge of the project's values and achievements spread, the project’s operational scope grew larger, first involving the remaining rural districts of Elche’s countryside (mid 1980s) and later the city of Elche (1990s). The project is highly esteemed by the local rural community, the general population of Elche, and experts on education and culture for its pioneering democratic, integrative and participatory nature, and can serve as a model demonstrating the feasibility of bottom-up heritage safeguarding.

Opinion of the merits of the proposal

Having examined the proposal of Spain (file reference number 00306), the working group is of the opinion that the project focuses on safeguarding of intangible cultural heritage, within a framework of cultural heritage in general, through formal and non-formal education. The project promotes the coordination of efforts for safeguarding intangible cultural heritage on a local level, and has a potential to widen its scope subregionally. It reflects the principles and objectives of the Convention by covering different domains of intangible heritage within the wider framework of cultural heritage. The effectiveness of the project in safeguarding the intangible cultural heritage of a small community in Spain, important within the local way of life, is demonstrated by four decades of experience and continued growth. The participation of community and individuals is well-demonstrated in the documents enclosed with the proposal signed by local NGOs, museums, teachers, schoolchildren and their families.

The project is a good example for long-term research, documentation, dissemination and revitalization of local traditional knowledge in order to strengthen the local identity and awareness of the importance of safeguarding intangible cultural heritage. It may serve as a model for local cooperation of all the participating agents (schools, museums, NGOs), and has the intention to widen its scope to regional cooperation. The participating partners are willing to cooperate in the dissemination of creative and innovative practices as demonstrated in the enclosed documents. The project’s results are shown by the growing size of the school museum’s collection of ICH artefacts and documentation of ICH safeguarding activities carried out over the past forty years. Because it is easily adaptable in educational frameworks, the project may be exemplary to developing countries and others.

Summary recommendation

The working group recommends that the Committee select this project for promotion as best reflecting the principles and objectives of the Convention.

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