Periodic reporting on the Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage

The Convention provides in Article 29 that States Parties shall submit to the Committee reports on the legislative, regulatory and other measures taken for the safeguarding of the intangible cultural heritage in their territories. Current page presents the periodic reports and deadlines of a country: Uganda (see overview on all States Parties).

Periodic reporting on the implementation of the Convention allows States Parties to assess their implementation of the Convention, evaluate their capacities for safeguarding intangible cultural heritage, report on their inventories of intangible cultural heritage and update the status of elements inscribed on the Representative List.

When elements are inscribed on the List of Intangible Cultural Heritage in Need of Urgent Safeguarding, the submitting State Party commits itself to take safeguarding measures aimed at strengthening the viability of the heritage concerned. Four years after inscription, the State Party reports to the Committee on the current situation of the element, the effectiveness of the safeguarding measures it has implemented, and the challenges it has encountered.


On the implementation of the Convention

Each State Party submits its periodic report to the Committee by 15 December of the sixth year following the year in which it deposited its instrument of ratification.

A report will be due by 15/12/2021

Report submitted in 2017 and to be examined by the Committee in 2018

On Urgent Safeguarding List elements

Reports on each element inscribed on the Urgent Safeguarding List are submitted by the State Party on 15 December of the fourth year following the year in which the element was inscribed, and every fourth year thereafter.

Bigwala, gourd trumpet music and dance of the Busoga Kingdom in Uganda, inscribed in 2012

To access the description of this element, the original nomination file (form, consent of communities, photos and video) and the decision of inscription, please consult dedicated webpage.

A report will be due by 15/12/2020

Report submitted on 15/12/2016 and examined by the Committee in 2017

Overview

soon available

Empaako tradition of the Batooro, Banyoro, Batuku, Batagwenda and Banyabindi of western Uganda, inscribed in 2013

To access the description of this element, the original nomination file (form, consent of communities, photos and video) and the decision of inscription, please consult dedicated webpage.

A report will be due by 15/12/2021

The report is to be submitted by 15/12/2017

Report submitted on 15/12/2014 and examined by the Committee in 2015

Overview

Empaako tradition is a naming system practised by Batooro, Banyoro, Batuku, Batagwenda and Banyabindi communities of western Uganda, whereby children are given one of twelve names shared across the communities in addition to their given and family names. Addressing a person by her or his Empaako name is a positive affirmation of social ties. It can be used as a greeting or a declaration of affection, respect, honour or love. The practice is associated with rituals and ceremonies whose meaning reinforces identity and belief systems. At the time of its inscription on the Urgent Safeguarding List in 2013, the Committee requested an extraordinary report to be examined at its tenth session.

Effectiveness of the safeguarding plan

The main objectives for safeguarding the element were to review the safeguarding plan, increase accessibility of information and knowledge about the element, and enhance the capacity of bearers to transmit knowledge and skills. The main results of the activities undertaken include a participatory review of the existing safeguarding plan; a safeguarding programme and mechanisms established for effective community and stakeholder participation; International Assistance requests elaborated and submitted to UNESCO; the implementation of a three-month pilot Empaako heritage conservation project by Banyoro communities and a fundraising strategy. The safeguarding activities also contributed to an increase in the mobilisation of stakeholders, leaders of rituals and 44 clans from the five communities, to revitalise the element. Public events, press conferences, festivals, workshops, a brochure and activities involving public leaders were reported to be very effective in raising awareness of the element and intangible cultural heritage in general for the specific communities and the Ugandan population. A monthly forum for representatives of the clans, established during the nomination process, has since been strengthened and is very effective in disseminating information and knowledge at the grassroots level. It has also contributed with the involvement of performers and artists for dissemination of safeguarding objectives. For example, regarding the raising of a monument in the main town of Empaako land.

Community participation

Many safeguarding initiatives have been planned, financed and undertaken by the communities, as well as individuals and groups. Members of the forum and cultural institutions within the five communities, such as chiefdoms, kingdoms and voluntary community associations, are responsible for managing these initiatives. During the reporting exercise, leaders from these institutions provided information on views of the communities regarding what achievements and challenges. The report was also sent to the communities for their comments and discussed at two monthly forum sessions.

Viability and current risks

The element is facing loss of meaning, social value and knowledge among bearers. A decline in observance of the naming ceremonies, as well as the number of bearers are among the main threats to viability of the element. Moreover, those who still give their children an Empaako name often abandon the associated rituals. In addition, it has been reported that there have been attacks on the practice from some religious groups mainly because of lack of knowledge about its meaning. In parallel, the language of the Empaako tradition, Runyoro-Rutooro, is declining in usage even among traditional bearer communities in favour of other more dominant languages.

Male-child cleansing ceremony of the Lango of central northern Uganda, inscribed in 2014

To access the description of this element, the original nomination file (form, consent of communities, photos and video) and the decision of inscription, please consult dedicated webpage.

A report will be due by 15/12/2018

Koogere oral tradition of the Basongora, Banyabindi and Batooro peoples, inscribed in 2015

To access the description of this element, the original nomination file (form, consent of communities, photos and video) and the decision of inscription, please consult dedicated webpage.

A report will be due by 15/12/2019

Ma’di bowl lyre music and dance, inscribed in 2016

To access the description of this element, the original nomination file (form, consent of communities, photos and video) and the decision of inscription, please consult dedicated webpage.

A report will be due by 15/12/2020
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