Empaako tradition of the Batooro, Banyoro, Batuku, Batagwenda and Banyabindi of western Uganda

    

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Inscribed in 2013 (8.COM) on the List of Intangible Cultural Heritage in Need of Urgent Safeguarding

© Engabu Za Tooro (EZT), 2013 :

Empaako is a naming system practised by the Batooro, Banyoro, Batuku, Batagwenda and Banyabindi, whereby children are given one of twelve names shared across the communities in addition to their given and family names. Addressing a person by her or his Empaako name is a positive affirmation of social ties. It can be used as a greeting or a declaration of affection, respect, honour or love. Use of Empaako can defuse tension or anger and sends a strong message about social identity and unity, peace and reconciliation. Empaako is given at a naming ceremony performed in the home and presided over by the clan head. The paternal aunts receive the baby and examine its features. Any resemblance to existing relatives forms the basis of the choice of name. The clan head then declares the name to the child. A shared meal of millet and smoked beef follows, gifts are presented to the baby and a tree is planted in its honour. The transmission of Empaako through naming rituals has dropped dramatically due to a general decline in appreciation of traditional culture and the diminishing use of the language associated with the element.

Periodic reporting

Periodic Report (USL)

A. Cover sheet

A.1.

State Party

Name of State Party

Uganda

A.2.

Date of deposit of the instrument of ratification, acceptance, approval or accession

This information is available online.

2009-05-13

A.3.

Element inscribed on the Urgent Safeguarding List that is the subject of this report

Name of element

Empaako tradition of the Batooro, Banyoro, Batuku, Batagwenda and Banyabindi of western Uganda

Inscribed in

2013

Submitting State(s)

Uganda

A.4.

Reporting period covered by this report

Please indicate the period covered by this report.

01-01-2018 - 31-12-2021

A.5.

Other elements inscribed on the Urgent Safeguarding List, if any

Please list all other elements from your country inscribed on the Urgent Safeguarding List, together with the year of inscription; for multinational elements, please indicate the other States concerned.

Bigwala, gourd trumpet music and dance of the Busoga Kingdom in Uganda (2012)
Koogere oral tradition of the Basongora, Banyabindi and Batooro peoples (2015)
Ma'di bowl lyre music and dance (2016)
Male-child cleansing ceremony of the Lango of central northern Uganda (2014)

A.6.

Executive summary of the report

Please provide an executive summary of the report that will allow general readers to understand the current status of the element, any positive or negative impacts of inscription, the implementation of safeguarding measures during the reporting period and their possible update for the following years.

This report concerns implementation of safeguarding measures for Empaako tradition of the Batooro, Banyoro, Batagwenda, Batuku and Banyabindi of Western Uganda which was, in December, 2013 inscribed on the list of intangible cultural heritage in need of urgent safeguarding. This is the 2nd ordinary report which is following the 1st which was approved in 2018 and an extra ordinary one which was approved in December, 2015.

Empaako is a naming system whereby in addition to family and given names, a child is given Empaako name selected from a fixed list of 12 of them, shared by the entire society. The use of Empaako is a declaration of respect, endearment or affection and the practice is associated with ceremonies and practices of which meaning from the basis of belief systems of concerned communities. Until the inscription in 2013, the practice was threatened by loss of knowledge of associated ceremonies, abandoning observance of these ceremonies, declining use of its language and attack from some religious groups.

A safeguarding plan which was adopted at inscription and revised immediately after, outlined capacity building of practitioners, comprehensive documentation of ceremonies and practices, mobilization of practitioners to revitalize performance of these ceremonies and raising awareness as key safeguarding measures. Others include linking the meaning of the practice to programs of environmental sustainability and peace building and contributing to the revitalization of the use of the language (Runyoro - Rutooro) where the practice thrives.

The extraordinary report which covered 16 months after inscription realized participatory review of the safeguarding plan, establishment of mechanisms for effective participation of all stakeholders and adopting an effective fundraising strategy. The first ordinary report approved in 2018, in addition to results in the extraordinary report which laid a ground for effective implementation of safeguarding measures, featured massive mobilization using radio, music, artists and online platforms. Others included success in fundraising and preparations for implementation of a big project co-funded by Intangible Cultural Heritage Fund.

The current report covers a period from January 2018 to December, 2021 and building on the previous results, highlights established capacity of practitioners to document for safeguarding and mobilized communities. Comprehensively documented and broadly disseminated knowledge of ceremonies and practices and raised awareness towards revitalization and transmission of the element to successive generations.

The future action focus on consolidation of realized results on capacity development, documentation and dissemination, linking and integration of the meaning of the practice into programs of environmental sustainability and peace building and ongoing connecting to programs for revitalization and development of the language.

A.7.

Contact person for correspondence

Provide the name, address and other contact information of the person responsible for correspondence concerning the report.

Title (Ms/Mr, etc.)

Mr

Family name

Rwagweri

Given name

Stephen

Institution/position

Executive Director

Address

Engabu Za Tooro (Tooro Youth Platform for Action)
P.O. Box 886
Fort Portal
Plot 18, Kaija Road, Fort Portal - Uganda
+256 772469751
engabuzatooro@gmail.com/info@engabuzatooro.or.ug

Telephone number

+256 772469751

E-mail address

engabuzatooro@gmail.com

Other relevant information


B. Status of element inscribed on the Urgent Safeguarding List

Refer to the nomination file or to previous reports, if any, as the basis for reporting on the current status of the element, and report only on relevant changes since the date of inscription on the List or since the previous report. Nomination files, specific timetables and earlier reports, if any, are available at https://ich.unesco.org or from the Secretariat, upon request.

The State Party shall pay special attention to the role of gender and shall endeavour to ensure the widest possible participation of the communities, groups and, where applicable, individuals concerned as well as relevant non-governmental organizations during the process of preparing this report, and is asked to describe how it has done so in point D below.

B.1.

Social and cultural functions

Please explain the social and cultural functions and meanings of the element today, within and for its community, the characteristics of the bearers and practitioners, and any specific roles or categories of persons with special responsibilities towards the element, among others. Attention should be given to any relevant changes related to inscription criterion U.1 (‘the element constitutes intangible cultural heritage as defined in Article 2 of the Convention’).

This report concerns Safeguarding Empaako Tradition of the Batooro, Banyoro, Batuku, Batagwenda and Banyabindi of Western Uganda which, in 2013, was inscribed on the list of Intangible Cultural Heritage in Need of Urgent Safeguarding.
Empaako is a naming system whereby in addition to the family and given names, children are given one name from a fixed list of 12 collectively called Empaako and shared across communities. They include Okaali which is exclusively for a king, Araali, Acaali, Bbala, and Apuuli which are exclusively for males, and Ateenyi, Akiiki, Abwoli, Atwoki, Adyeri, Amooti and Abbooki which can be given either sex.
Empaako practice is transmitted through a naming ceremony which has several rituals that have slight variations from community to community. The meaning and interpretations of the rituals are linked to the value systems of these communities. In the naming ceremony, the paternal aunties receive the baby and examine its features. Any resemblance to the living or living dead relatives forms the basis of the choice of Empaako to give the baby.
After discussion on proposals, the clan head rules and declares the chosen Empaako by addressing it directly to the baby. A shared meal of millet and smoked beef follows, gifts are presented to the baby and tree or banana is planted in its honour.
In case of a child born outside own clan or an out sider who comes to live in a community, a ceremony which involves sharing Omwani (coffee barriers) and milk and kubukara (a reception ritual involving sitting on the lap of the head of clan to receive blessings) is organized.
In greeting, the two address each other using Empaako and one asks Empaako only on first interaction. Addressing using someone’s exact Empaako, affirms that 'I know and recognize you as person' since they are only 12 shares by entire society.
The use of Empaako helps to define and categorize a web of social relationships and interactions. Addressing using Empaako to a parent, an elder, a leader, a spirit medium or god is a declaration of respect and honour and to a lover, a tender minor, a sick, a suffering, a missed or dead dear one is an expression of love or affection. Empaako is also used in expressing thanks, bidding farewell and appealing for favour from both human and super human beings.
The Empaako is used to affirm human dignity and enforce the acceptable code of social conduct. For instance when someone is found in unacceptable behaviour will be asked "Do you have Empaako? "This sends serious message of caution. In the minds of the bearer, addressing using Empaako suspends other factors in order to affirm the supremacy of the common principle of humanity. This is why addressing by Empaako has an effect of diffusing and neutralizing tension and anger and then Empaako is used as a tool in the mechanisms of community conflict mitigation and resolution.

B.2.

Assessment of its viability and current risks

Please describe the current level of viability of the element, particularly the frequency and extent of its practice, the strength of traditional modes of transmission, the demographics of practitioners and audiences and its sustainability. Please also identify and describe the threats, if any, to the element's continued transmission and enactment and describe the severity and immediacy of such threats, giving particular attention to any strengthening or weakening of the element’s viability subsequent to inscription.

After inscription and the subsequent implementation of the safeguarding measurers, the knowledge of Empaako naming ceremonies and associated practices have been comprehensively documented in print and digital formats and broadly disseminated. This knowledge is now being adopted in formal and informal education and information channels including social media, electronic and print media, museums, libraries, theatres, schools, research and cultural centers.

The observance of rituals and ceremonies in traditional contexts in homes following birth of children has been revitalized. Additionally, the practitioners have adapted the rituals and ceremonies in modern social and cultural contexts including festivals, social events and tourism activities. Performing Empaako giving ceremony as a gesture of welcoming and integrating visitors in the community, has emerged as a common practice. Annual festivals built on the meaning and practice of Empaako have been spontaneously established by cultural and entertainment practitioners in different communities. Ritual planning and guiding has emerged as a specific career, dominated by youth who are mastering the knowledge of the rituals and are paid for their services.

The youth living in urban centers have taken the lead in adapting the practice in modern contexts. Although these new contexts of practicing have got a commercial aspect, the main driver is sharing and expressing cultural identity and values. The documentation also provided content for the youth to adapt in their social media communications.

The documentation captured information on the practice in its original language with an English translation. Combined with restored pride in identity and heritage, this provided vernacular expressions for the youth to use in their current lifestyle. It also provided materials for heritage and cultural education in formal education and training where policies are already sufficiently favorable. The safeguarding measures of Empaako practice provided basic material for language education, provided youth and media with vernacular content, restored community pride in using the language and will continue to inspire and link other initiatives for the overall revitalization of the language in which the practice thrives.

There has been massive and spontaneous adoption of words and symbols of Empaako heritage into naming of entities being established among Empaako communities. These include public institutions, private businesses, social groups and activity branding. This reflects revitalized appreciation of the values of the heritage and desire to project it into the future.

The negative narratives about Empaako practice that were generated and promoted by religious cults have disappeared. Although followers of such groups which had grossly discouraged observance of the practice, continue not practicing it, there is general appreciation that decampaigning the practice is not plausible and necessary.

As reported previously, inscription and subsequent implementation of safeguarding mobilized extra communities especially from the neighboring DR Congo who claim they share that heritage and wished to be added on the expressed list at inscription and be effectively reached in safeguarding program. However, during the reporting period, these communities were displaced by wars in addition to effects of COVID – 19 pandemic that they could not pursue this further.

B.3.

Implementation of safeguarding measures

Please report on the safeguarding measures described in the nomination file, and previous report, if any. Describe how they have been implemented and how they have substantially contributed to the safeguarding of the element during the reporting period, taking note of external or internal constraints such as limited resources. Include, in particular, information on the measures taken to ensure the viability of the element by enabling the community to continue to practise and transmit it. Include the following detailed information concerning the implementation of the set of safeguarding measures or safeguarding plan:

B.3.a. Objectives and results

Indicate what primary objective(s) were addressed and what concrete results were attained during the reporting period.

General Objectives.
1-Revitalization of the performance of ceremonies and observance of practices associated with Empaako naming system in the five Empaako communities of Uganda.
2-Enhancement of the capacity of the bearers of the Traditional Empaako naming system, to transmit to successive generations, its knowledge, skills, meaning and social values.

Results attained
1-Capacity of five communities in Uganda to document for safeguarding their intangible cultural heritage and particularly Empaako naming system strengthened.
Twelve trained trainers in ICH documentation from the five communities trained practitioners on identifying elements of intangible cultural heritage, collecting and processing data around them.

Sixty nine trained practitioners of intangible cultural heritage organised information gathering about their own practices especially on Empaako naming system. High quality documentation equipment was availed and is being used by the members of the five communities in ongoing recording of their own expressions and practices. The equipment was consolidated into an ICH unit, now operating as a centre of ongoing training, recording, processing, distribution and online dissemination of intangible cultural heritage documentation.

2-Availability of and accessibility to information and knowledge of the ceremonies and practices associated with Empaako naming system, increased for its five communities in Uganda and for the present and future generations.
Knowledge and information of the ceremonies and practices associated with Empaako naming system was generated in workshops, data collection, clan meetings, radio talk shows and interactive online platforms and was consolidated and projected to the future through 8 music productions, 5 video productions, 102 page print publication and 4 online repository and dissemination platforms.
3-The awareness about meaning, social values and need to safeguard Empaako naming system raised among the bearers and stakeholders in its five communities in Uganda.
Empaako naming ceremonies and the system in general is increasingly being appreciated, leading to actions like five festivals and community events build around Empaako naming systems, spontaneous music productions on Empaako naming system, 165 Million Uganda shillings (US$ 39,000) raised in locally established fund for ongoing community safeguarding initiatives of Empaako naming system.
4- The practitioners and custodians of the traditional Empaako naming system in its five communities, mobilized by themselves for revitalizations of performance of associated ceremonies and observance of associated practices.
Ritual guide emerged as a distinct career for people who are identified in the community to have deep knowledge of Empaako naming ceremonies and with capacity to pass it on to others and guide naming ceremonies and are increasingly consulted by families. There is increasing observance of these naming ceremonies in daily life of communities as reported by community coordinators and monthly clan meetings.

B.3.b. Safeguarding activities

List the key activities that were carried out during this reporting period in order to achieve these expected results. Please describe the activities in detail and note their effectiveness or any problems encountered in implementing them.

ESTABLISHMENT OF EMPAAKO DOCUMENTATION UNIT
A unit equipped with audio-visual recording kit, (Sonny Px wx704k) still photo camera (Nikon) 22.4 mega pixels, video editing computer (apple) Mac Book Pro 13.3, Studio led monitor (42HDMI) heavy duty studio sound mixer (H4) and a stand by generator (3KA) m was established.
The functions of the unit include audio-visual recording, video editing, photo editing, archiving audio-visual materials and photographs into the online repository platforms like flickr, YouTube and audio farm and maintaining video and photo libraries. The unit also links with communication departments for dissemination through social media platforms, website, blog and activity and project reports. It serves the ongoing ICH documentation in the communities and beyond and provides ongoing training in skills of documentation.
DEVELOPING A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO COMMUNITY-SELF DOCUMENTATION OF ICH
A documentation expert was contracted and reviewed existing literature, including the UNESCO ICH global capacity-building materials on documentation and community-based inventorying, and traditional documentation systems of five communities concerned, as well as interviewed practitioners and stakeholders and compiled, and presented a draft customized practical guide which was also proofread by 3 specialists. The final document was printed in English version and in Runyoro - Rutooro and guided the workshops and data collection.
TRAINING OF TRAINERS (TOT) WORKSHOP
Ten days TOT workshop was held and was attended by 34 participants who included professionals at community level in the field of performing art, language, broadcasting, photography, videography and publication and the 17 members of Project Management Committee. Five specialists in ICH facilitated the workshop and were drawn from Makerere University, Uganda Ministry in charge of Culture, The Uganda Museum, the Cross Cultural Foundation of Uganda (CCFU) and Communication Department of World Vision International in addition to Ms. Emily Drani and Ms. Juliana Akoryo as National ICH experts.
12 participants were certified as trainers of ICH documentation and put into the databases for future use.
Capacity building workshops in Fort Portal and Hoima
Two, 10 days residential capacity building workshops were held in Fort Portal in December, 2018 and another in Hoima in January, 2019 with 37 and 32 participants respectively. Each workshop, used 7 facilitators from the commissioned community based trainers supervised by two national experts. Participants were commissioned as community-based documentors.

Documentation of ceremonies and practices associated with Empaako naming system

12 commissioned community based ICH documentors from each community, technically guided by 10 community based professionals, collected data through interviews and focus group discussions in five communities. Two Empaako naming ceremonies were recorded from each of the five communities. Specialized consultants were contracted to compile, edit and produced the data in different forms;

- 102 page book printed in English with Runyoro – Rutooro translation (2000 and 3000 copies) respectively. Five 30 minutes video productions (one per community), four different audio and audio visual formats for social media platforms and 20 visual art pieces in different styles.

Dissemination of the documented knowledge of the ceremonies and practices associated with Empaako naming system.

Dissemination aimed at imparting knowledge and skills of transmitting the practice to practitioners, youth and public for increased appreciation and viability of the practice. Diverse methods to reach diversity of audiences were employed.

- Monthly clan representatives meetings were organized throughout the project period to offer planning and monitoring support and share progressive results.

- A weekly two hours talkshow was conducted throughout the project period on Voice of Toro FM for mobilization of participants, information and dissemination of progressive results.

- A brochure (500 copies), four banners, T-shirts (300 pieces) were produced and distributed.

- Two national press conferences, several spontaneous national media coverage and two 2 hours national television programmes were organized.

- Eight music items around the documented knowledge were produced and integrated in community entertainment.

- General launching event was organized and attended by about 1500 people who included clan leaders, practitioners, leaders of community institutions, schools, museum, library and theatre operators.

- Distribution of book and video copies was done to 25 schools, two community libraries and five national and community museums.

- The 102 documentation book and 30 minutes video productions on each of the five communities are uploaded on two websites and the audio-visual materials are adapted to different formats and shared through different online platforms where they give results as follows;

Website:
www.engabuzatooro.or.ug (January - December, 2021)
- Number of visits 16,094
- Hits 231,454
Blog : www.engabutooro.blogspot.com, 72,115 views (all time)
Twitter: http://twitter.com/ezt_uganda, 3,856 following and 436 followers
Facebook account: https://www.facebook.com/engabuzatooro, 5,000 friends
Facebook page: https://facebook.com/Engabu-Za-Tooro-Organisation-124973400901132, 2,374 likes and 2,432 followers
Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/user/Engabuzatooro 105,203 views and 1.24k subscribers (lifetime)
All audio recordings and music developed around the project is consolidated in an audio farm. https://soundcloud.com/engabu-zatooro, 4,466 plays (all time)
The photos are uploaded to flickr: https://www.flickr.com/people/158032353@N06/, 39.5k Views (4th December 2021).

Linking meaning of Empaako heritage to environmental sustainability
The program of planting trees led by families and clans, inspired and tagged to the meaning of Empaako heritage continued expanding among the Banyoro community and facilitated by Cross Cultural Foundation Uganda.

Linking safeguarding program to activities and processes of international year of indigenous languages.
As part of building efforts to revitalise Runyoro/Rutooro language which is a key driver of safeguarding Empaako practice, efforts were made to follow and participate where resources allowed, in global activities and process for observing international year of indigenous languages 2019 with a view of sharing information and identifying opportunities for revitalisation of the language.

Two of the activities which were foreseen in the general timetable (2018 - 2021) were not done.
- Providing scholarship to community based professionals to facilitate language training and promotions. This was due to failure to realise funding.
- The nomination of the element on extended basis to cover the emerging claimant communities. This was due to communities which raised the demand in Eastern DR Congo were displaced by the still ongoing wars in addition to effects of COVID – 19 pandemic.

B.3.c. Participation of communities, groups or individuals in the safeguarding activities

Describe how communities, groups or, if appropriate, individuals as well as relevant non-governmental organizations have effectively participated, including in terms of gender roles, in the safeguarding measures. Describe the role of the implementing organization or body (name, background, etc.) and the human resources that were available for implementing safeguarding activities.

Five out of sixty-five Ugandan indigenous communities are bearers of Empaako naming system. They include Batooro, Banyoro, Batuku, Banyabindi and Batagwenda. These communities are represented by 44 clans of which membership cut across. Clan leaders, represented up to family level, are the key custodians and practitioners of Empaako tradition. They cause and lead cultural rituals and ceremonies including ceremonies associated with Empaako naming system. Traditionally, all clans in a particular community collectively used to be represented by a king or a chief. But today this is not working across all communities. In some communities, the cultural voice, above the clan level, is better represented by voluntary community associations. Therefore, these communities in matters of culture are represented by clans, chiefdoms and voluntary community associations.
The clan leaders were mobilized right from inventorying and nomination of Empaako tradition and formed a monthly forum a round safeguarding
This safeguarding plan, was implemented by the communities as the main drivers. With the exception of representatives of government and NGO stakeholders, all participants in the project were mobilized and nominated by leaders of the community institutions from their own membership.
During the development of the practical guide to community self-documentation of ICH, communities provided information on their traditional systems of keeping information and approved the draft.
During all capacity-building workshops the identified 10 community professionals (at least 4 are women) facilitated and resourceful elders informed the discussions, in addition to participants being community representatives.
During documentation, 12 community documenters (at least 4 are women) did sensitization, organization and coordination, while community based professionals executed technical tasks of data collection, guided by the expert.
Community leaders and structures were used to disseminate the documented knowledge.
The radio programs and monthly clans’ representative meetings which are mobilizing bearers towards revitalizing performance of naming ceremonies, are organized and facilitated by clan leaders.
Representatives of 5 community institutions represented communities on the Project Management Committee that carried out overall monitoring and evaluation of the project.
The clans’ representative forum and 5 cultural / community institutions, are some of the institutions which planned and will execute follow-up activities and which integrates outputs and intentions of the project, into their individual institutional operations.
A culture fund which mobilises community resources to support ongoing safeguarding was established by the forum of the clans.
The lead implementing organisation Engabu Za Tooro (Tooro Youth Platform for Action) was founded in 1999 with a mission of strengthening the capacity of communities through development of cultural enterprises and promotion of preservation of cultural heritage. It has wide experience in research on cultural documentation and inventorying and being funded by some major international development institutions including Hivos, UNESCO and Commonwealth Foundation among others. With a team of 7 specialists in relevant fields, its role was focused on coordination and facilitation supplemented by experts and consultants.

B.3.d. Timetable

Indicate in a timetable when each activity was implemented.

OVER ALL WORK PLAN 2018 – 2021
Establishment of Empaako documentation unit. The functions of the unit include audio-visual recording, video editing, photo editing, archiving audio-visual materials and photographs into the online repository platforms like flickr, YouTube and audio farm and maintaining video and photo libraries. The unit also links with communication departments for dissemination through social media platforms, website, blog and activity and project reports. It serves the ongoing ICH documentation in the communities and beyond and provides ongoing training in skills of documentation (January 2018 – December 2019)
Developing a practical guide to community-self documentation of Intangible Cultural Heritage A documentation expert was contracted and reviewed existing literature, including the UNESCO ICH global capacity-building materials on documentation and community-based inventorying, and traditional documentation systems of five communities concerned, as well as interviewed practitioners and stakeholders and compiled, and presented a draft customized practical guide which was also proofread by 3 specialists. The final document was printed in English version and in Runyoro - Rutooro and guided the workshops and data collection (January 2018 – December 2018)
Capacity building actions which included training of trainiers, capacity building workshops in Hoima and Fort Portal and general office and salary expenditures and monitoring ane valuation (January 2018 – December 2021) Documentation of ceremonies and practices associated with Empaako naming system. 12 commissioned community based ICH documentors from each community, technically guided by 10 community based professionals, collected data through interviews and focus group discussions in five communities. Two Empaako naming ceremonies were recorded from each of the five communities (January 2018 – December 2021)
Dissemination of the documented knowledge of the ceremonies and practices associated with Empaako naming system. Dissemination aimed at imparting knowledge and skills of transmitting the practice to practitioners, youth and public for increased appreciation and viability of the practice. Diverse methods to reach diversity of audiences were employed (January 2018 – December 2021)
Linking meaning of Empaako heritage to environmental sustainability. The program of planting trees led by families and clans, inspired and tagged to the meaning of Empaako heritage continued expanding among the Banyoro community and facilitated by Cross Cultural Foundation Uganda (January 2018 – December 2021).
Linking safeguarding program to activities and processes of international year of indigenous languages. As part of building efforts to revitalise Runyoro/Rutooro language which is a key driver of safeguarding Empaako practice, efforts were made to follow and participate where resources allowed, in global activities and process for observing international year of indigenous languages 2019 with a view of sharing information and identifying opportunities for revitalisation of the language (January 2018 – December 2021).

B.3.e. Budget expenditures

Provide the detailed amounts of the funds used for the implementation of each activity (if possible, in US dollars), identifying the funding source for each (governmental sources, in-kind community inputs, etc.).

BUDGET ESTIMATES
Establishment of Empaako documentation unit. The functions of the unit include audio-visual recording, video editing, photo editing, archiving audio-visual materials and photographs into the online repository platforms like flickr, YouTube and audio farm and maintaining video and photo libraries. (January 2018 – December 2019) US$ 18,170
Developing a practical guide to community-self documentation of Intangible Cultural Heritage A documentation expert was contracted and reviewed existing literature, including the UNESCO ICH global capacity-building materials on documentation and community-based inventorying, and traditional documentation systems of five communities concerned, as well as interviewed practitioners and stakeholders and compiled, and presented a draft customized practical guide which was also proofread by 3 specialists. The final document was printed in English version and in Runyoro - Rutooro and guided the workshops and data collection (January 2018 – December 2018) US$ 9,950
Capacity building actions which included training of trainiers, capacity building workshops in Hoima and Fort Portal and general office and salary expenditures and monitoring ane valuation (January 2018 – December 2021) US$156,200.
Documentation of ceremonies and practices associated with Empaako naming system. 12 commissioned community based ICH documentors from each community, technically guided by 10 community based professionals, collected data through interviews and focus group discussions in five communities. Two Empaako naming ceremonies were recorded from each of the five communities (January 2018 – December 2021) US$ 68,250
Dissemination of the documented knowledge of the ceremonies and practices associated with Empaako naming system. Dissemination aimed at imparting knowledge and skills of transmitting the practice to practitioners, youth and public for increased appreciation and viability of the practice. Diverse methods to reach diversity of audiences were employed (January 2018 – December 2021) US$ 14,340.
Linking meaning of Empaako heritage to environmental sustainability. The program of planting trees led by families and clans, inspired and tagged to the meaning of Empaako heritage continued expanding among the Banyoro community and facilitated by Cross Cultural Foundation Uganda (January 2018 – December 2021) US$ 7,500.

Linking safeguarding program to activities and processes of international year of indigenous languages. As part of building efforts to revitalise Runyoro/Rutooro language which is a key driver of safeguarding Empaako practice, efforts were made to follow and participate where resources allowed, in global activities and process for observing international year of indigenous languages 2019 with a view of sharing information and identifying opportunities for revitalisation of the language (January 2018 – December 2021). US$ 10,000

TOTAL US$ 284,410

B.3.f. Overall effectiveness of the safeguarding activities

Provide an overall assessment of the effectiveness of the activities undertaken to achieve the expected results and of the efficiency of the use of funds for implementing the activities. Please indicate how the activities contributed to achieving the results and whether other activities could have contributed better to achieving the same results. Also indicate whether the same results could have been achieved with less funding, whether the human resources available were appropriate and whether communities, groups and individuals could have been better involved.

- Establishment of Empaako documentation unit.
This unit as a centre of ICH documentation and its training was very effective and impactful as it goes beyond the project timeframe to ongoing and sustainable training and documentation and attracts future documentation initiatives. Documentation actions are able to be centralized and outputs systematically archived.
- Developing a practical guide to community self documentation of ICH.
This was effective as it was developed by experts in consultation with practitioners. However it requires continuous review, adaptation and translation to different community languages. The time allocated to it initially with assumption that it immediately guides the documentation in the same project was insufficient as its proper development became an ongoing process throughout the whole project cycle and beyond. The initial plan didn’t have sufficient number of proof readers and meeting of validation and adoption by stakeholders which were later considered a necessity.
- Training of trainers.
This was very effective as it targeted community based professionals in ICH fields. However, the commissioned trainers need to consolidate their competencies with more similar engagements in near future. The expectation that after training of trainers, the trained trainers would immediately manage the subsequent capacity building with limited experts involved was unrealistic.
- Documentation of ceremonies and practices of Empaako naming system.
The process was comprehensive and participatory on good representative sampled ceremonies per community. The product of documentation created a benchmark where future scale up initiatives can base.
- Dissemination of the documentation of Empaako naming ceremonies and practices.
The methods adopted to disseminate the knowledge were effective as they targeted diversity of audiences and sustainability through adoption by different communication, entertainment and education channels.
- Activities contributing towards revitalization of the language where the practice thrives.
The activities on the language were limited to documenting and disseminating the practice in its original language and opening linkages and attracting further initiatives for revitalization of the language The planned scholarship to train language trainers was not done due to lack of funding. There is need for more concrete interventions to realize revitalization of the language which will require more specific projects and funding.
- Linking the meaning of the practice to environmental sustainability and peace building.
These activities were carried out as supplementary to the main project and by different and independent actors. So, they were not aligned and harmonized with the main program and its timetable although they fit in the overall objective of the safeguarding plan.

C. Update of the safeguarding measures

C.1.

Updated safeguarding plan

Please provide an update of the safeguarding plan included in the nomination file or in the previous report. In particular provide detailed information as follows:

  1. a. What primary objective(s) will be addressed and what concrete results will be expected?
  2. b. What are the key activities to be carried out in order to achieve these expected results? Describe the activities in detail and in their best sequence, addressing their feasibility.
  3. c. How will the State(s) Party(ies) concerned support the implementation of the updated safeguarding plan?

Overall objective
1-Revitalization of the performance of ceremonies and observance of practices associated with Empaako naming system in the five Empaako communities of Uganda.
2-Enhancement of the capacity of the bearers of the Traditional Empaako naming system, to transmit to successive generations, its knowledge, skills, meaning and social values.

Expected results
1. The documented knowledge of Empaako naming ceremonies and associated practices consolidated and adopted in formal and informal education programs.
2. The established capacity of practitioners of Empaako naming system to document for safeguarding knowledge and practices of Empaako naming system and their intangible cultural heritage in general consolidated.
3. The meaning and values of Empaako naming system increasingly adapted into environmental sustainability and peace building community activities.
4. The use of Runyoro – Rutooro vernacular in which the practicing of Empaako naming system thrives, increasingly getting revitalised.

Activities
1. Continuously monitoring the trends of observing Empaako naming rituals and ceremonies in communities and developing annual reports for consideration by annual stakeholders meeting.
2. Ongoing monitoring of integration of knowledge of Empaako naming system in informal and formal communication and education content through an annual survey and stakeholders meeting
3. Ongoing facilitation of integration of the meaning and values of Empaako naming system to programs of environmental sustainability and peace building through developing and distributing integration guide materials and facilitation meetings and connecting to relevant projects.
4. Linking with programs of international decade of indigenous languages and other opportunities for supporting actions of revitalising and development of the language.
5. Receiving and considering requests and proposals from additional communities which are claiming to be bearers of the Empaako naming system especially from DR Congo with a view of exploring possibilities of extending the results of inscription and safeguarding program to their own communities.

How the State Party concerned will support the implementation of the plan.
The relevant officers of the local governments which are covering the communities concerned with Empaako naming system, formed ICH Safeguarding committees which will manage a process of incorporating safeguarding of ICH in their Local Government Plans and Budgets and hence secure funding contribution to the safeguarding plan of Empaako naming system. These committees will also link up and be part of the monitoring committees for projects implementing this safeguarding plan.

The ministry in charge of Culture and Relevant National Government Institutions; including National Curriculum Development Centre, National Cultural Center, National Museum, National theatre and Uganda libraries Board, will continue provide technical guidance, monitoring support, distribution and knowledge dissemination infrastructure and support integration of documentation outputs into training and education system.

C.2.

Timetable for future actitivies

Provide a timetable for the updated safeguarding plan (within a time-frame of approximately four years).

UPDATED OVER ALL WORK PLAN FROM JANUARY 2022 TO DECEMBER 2025
1. Continuously monitoring the trends of observing Empaako naming rituals and ceremonies in communities and developing annual reports for consideration by annual stakeholders meeting from January 2022 to December 2025
2. Ongoing monitoring of integration of knowledge of Empaako naming system in informal and formal communication and education content through an annual survey and stakeholders meeting from January 2022 to December 2025
3. Ongoing facilitation of integration of the meaning and values of Empaako naming system to programs of environmental sustainability and peace building through developing and distributing integration guide materials and facilitation meetings and connecting to relevant projects from January 2022 to December 2025
4. Linking with programs of international decade of indigenous languages and other opportunities for supporting actions of revitalising and development of the language from January 2022 to December 2025
5. Receiving and considering requests and proposals from additional communities which are claiming to be bearers of the Empaako naming system especially from DR Congo with a view of exploring possibilities of extending the results of inscription and safeguarding program to their own communities from January 2022 to December 2025
6. General evaluation and reporting for every October to December of the implementation period (January2022 to December 2025)

C.3.

Budget for future activities

Provide the estimates of the funds required for implementing the updated safeguarding plan (if possible, in US dollars), identifying any available resources (governmental sources, in-kind community inputs, etc.).

BUDGET ESTIMATES
1. Continuously monitoring the trends of observing Empaako naming rituals and ceremonies in communities and developing annual reports for consideration by annual stakeholders meeting (January 2022 – December 2025) US$ 10,000
2. Ongoing monitoring of integration of knowledge of Empaako naming system in informal and formal communication and education content through an annual survey and stakeholders meeting (January 2022 – December 2025) US$ 20,000
3. Ongoing facilitation of integration of the meaning and values of Empaako naming system to programs of environmental sustainability and peace building through developing and distributing integration guide materials and facilitation meetings and connecting to relevant projects (January 2022 – December 2025) US$ 6,000
4. Linking with programs of international decade of indigenous languages and other opportunities for supporting actions of revitalising and development of the language (January 2022 – December 2025) US$ 10,000
5. Receiving and considering requests and proposals from additional communities which are claiming to be bearers of the Empaako naming system especially from DR Congo with a view of exploring possibilities of extending the results of inscription and safeguarding program to their own communities (January 2022 – December 2025) US$ 5,000
6. General evaluation and reporting (Every October - December) 15,000

TOTAL BUDGET US$ 66,000

Sources
1. Government institutions – Personnel, Venues, Funds
2. Partner NGOs - Personnel, Venues, rent, equipment, Funds
3. Clans and Community Institutions – Services, Funds, Venues

C.4.

Community participation

Please describe how communities, groups and individuals, as well as relevant non-governmental organizations have been involved, including in terms of gender roles, in updating the safeguarding plan, and how they will be involved in its implementation.

The communities of Batooro, Banyoro, Batuku, Batagwenda and Banyabindi are represented by the 44 clan institutions of which membership cut across all the five communities. There are also represented by cultural institutions like chiefdoms and Kingdoms and voluntary community associations. These do not apply uniformly in all communities but each community has at least one of the above community collective mechanisms. The clan leaders represented up to family unit are the custodians of the community’s intangible cultural heritage. They cause and lead all traditional rituals and cultural ceremonies in the communities. Their mission is to ensure practice and transmission of the community’s intangible cultural heritage. Clans, collectively forms Cultural Institutions like Chiefdoms.

Updating the safeguarding plan which emerged from a program evaluation process which involved technical consultation and consultative meetings where all stakeholders were involved while ensuring gender balance.

Communities represented by youth groups, practitioner groups, clans and cultural institutions leaders were key respondents and provided all the information. They also provided the recommendations which reflect their understanding of issues and their interests and perspectives. These were executed through one consultative meeting per community. The safeguarding plan is designed with a principle of community self help and therefore community resources inform of cash and in-kind contributions was involved in every action of updating the plan.

The same communities considered and approved the final draft of the plan through the central program management committee where the representatives of communities make 80% with a deliberately determined balance of gender.

Similarly, community representatives will be main drivers of implementation of the plan. Over the time the program has developed community based facilitators, professionals, supervisors and technical operators from youth groups, practitioner groups, clans, community based organizations and cultural institutions leaders. These complement all actions with technical supervision of experts and state party officials.

C.5.

Institutional context

Please report on the institutional context for the local management and safeguarding of the element inscribed on the Urgent Safeguarding List, including:

  1. a. the competent body(ies) involved in its management and/or safeguarding;
  2. b. the organization(s) of the community or group concerned with the element and its safeguarding.

The competent bodies involved in management and facilitating Safeguarding Empaako element include; Engabu Za Tooro – Tooro Youth Platform for Action, a 15 years old cultural NGO, accredited to the IGC of the 2003 UNESCO Convention. The second is the Department of Culture and Family Affairs of the Ministry of Gender Labour and Social Development.

The community organizations concerned with Empaako element include, the 44 clan institutions currently having a monthly clans representative forum on the safeguarding concerns, Tooro Kingdom, Bunyoro Kingdom and Banyabindi culture and Development Trust.

D. Participation of communities in preparing this report

Describe the measures taken to ensure the widest possible participation of the communities, groups and, where applicable, individuals concerned as well as relevant non-governmental organizations during the process of preparing this report.

A facilitator was identified by the implementing organization to coordinate and compile this report with the participation of the communities.
Updating meetings were organized by the leaders of the participating community institutions in the five participating communities. These leaders included the Executive of Banyabindi Culture and Development Trust, Ekoomi ya Batuku and contact persons for Batagwenda, Tooro Kingdom and Bunyoro Kingdom. The meetings facilitated by the expert, generated information on what the communities feel they have accomplished and the challenges that were met. This information fed into the draft report which was sent back to the communities through their contact persons for comments. The comments received from the communities were considered before a final draft was compiled. The established monthly clan representative forum that convene in Fort-Portal discussed this first report as an agenda item on two sittings.
The first meeting generated information for the report and the second considered the draft report. Through the activities executives the staff of the Ministry of Gender Labour and Social Development independently collected information provided by the communities which also fed into the process of report development.

E. Signature on behalf of the State Party

The report should be signed by an official empowered to do so on behalf of the State, and should include his or her name, title and the date of submission.

Name

Title

Date

Signature

Upload signed version in PDF


Periodic Report (USL)

A. Cover sheet

A.1.

State Party

Name of State Party

Uganda

A.2.

Date of deposit of the instrument of ratification, acceptance, approval or accession

This information is available online.

2009-05-13

A.3.

Element inscribed on the Urgent Safeguarding List that is the subject of this report

Name of element

Empaako tradition of the Batooro, Banyoro, Batuku, Batagwenda and Banyabindi of western Uganda

Inscribed in

2013

A.4.

Reporting period covered by this report

Please indicate the period covered by this report.

April 2015 - December 2017

A.5.

Other elements inscribed on the Urgent Safeguarding List, if any

Please list all other elements from your country inscribed on the Urgent Safeguarding List, together with the year of inscription; for multinational elements, please indicate the other States concerned.

Bigwala, gourd trumpet music and dance of the Busoga Kingdom in Uganda (2012)

A.6.

Executive summary of the report

Please provide an executive summary of the report that will allow general readers to understand the current status of the element, any positive or negative impacts of inscription, the implementation of safeguarding measures during the reporting period and their possible update for the following years.

This report concerns implementation of safeguarding measures for Empaako tradition of the Batooro, Banyoro, Batagwenda, Batuku and Bunyabindi of western Uganda which was, in December 2013, inscribed on the list of Intangible Cultural Heritage in Need of Urgent Safeguarding. This is the first ordinary report but the second one following an extra ordinary which was approved in December 2015.

Empaako is a naming system whereby in addition to the family and given names, a child is given Empaako name selected from a fixed list of 12 of them, shared by the entire society. The use of Empaako is a declaration of respect, endearment or affection and the practice is associated with ceremonies and practices of which meaning form the basis of belief systems of the concerned communities. The practice is threatened by loss of knowledge of associated ceremonies, abandoning observance of these ceremonies, declining use of its language and attack from religious groups.

Safeguarding plan adopted at inscription and revised immediately after, outlines capacity building of practitioners, comprehensive documentation of ceremonies and practices, mobilization of practitioners to revitalize performance of naming ceremonies and raising awareness as key safeguarding measures. Others include linking its Safeguarding and documentation outputs to education, training scholarship for its language professionals, linking the meaning of the practice to programing on peace building and environmental sustainability and nomination for inscription on extended basis to include the emerging claimant bearer communities in the neighboring state territory of Democratic Republic of Congo.

The extra ordinary report covered 16months from inscription and mainly realized participatory review of the safeguarding plan, establishing mechanism for effective participation of all stakeholders and adopting a fundraising strategy that included elaboration and submission of an IAR to UNESCO. Other realized results were mobilization of practitioners through weekly radio talk shows, and monthly clan meetings and raising of awareness through several events which were celebrating inscription and artistic productions on the element by performing artists and constructing of an inscription memorial monument in the major town. A pilot project of using the meaning of the practice to promote tree planting, laid a foundation for realizing the result of adapting the meaning of this cultural practice into programming on peace building and environmental sustainability.

The current report which builds on the extra ordinary one that was approved in 2015, covers a period of two years and nine months from April 2015 to December 2017.

In this period the mobilization of practitioners to revitalize observance of naming ceremonies continued through the weekly radio talk shows and monthly clans meetings which activities are well adapted to the local resources. This has had a scale up effect of adopting a standing agenda item on encouraging revitalization of naming ceremonies, in every individual clan assemblies. Raising awareness continued through on going distribution of brochures and the produced artistic pieces which are integrated in community social activities, informal education and entertainment.

Empaako platform which is an online community and data bank was developed and launched in preparation for broad dissemination of documentation and effective sharing among the bearers of Empaako naming system wherever they live. Empaako heritage conservation project on using the cultural meaning of the practice, to promote tree planting was scaled up. The reporting period also realized review and follow up of the IAR from UNESCO up to getting approval, among other fundraising activities. This reporting period has successfully prepared for, and will be immediately followed by a full scale safeguarding project co-funded by Intangible Cultural Heritage Fund. The 21 months project, will consolidate and bring to a climax, most of safeguarding measures proposed in the general safeguarding plan.

A.7.

Contact person for correspondence

Provide the name, address and other contact information of the person responsible for correspondence concerning the report.

Title (Ms/Mr, etc.)

Mr

Family name

Rwagweri

Given name

Stephen

Institution/position

Executive Director

Address

Engabu Za Tooro (Tooro Youth Platform for Action)
P.O. Box 886
Fort Portal

Telephone number

+256 772469751

E-mail address

engabuzatooro@gmail.com

Other relevant information


B. Status of element inscribed on the Urgent Safeguarding List

Refer to the nomination file or to previous reports, if any, as the basis for reporting on the current status of the element, and report only on relevant changes since the date of inscription on the List or since the previous report. Nomination files, specific timetables and earlier reports, if any, are available at https://ich.unesco.org or from the Secretariat, upon request.

The State Party shall pay special attention to the role of gender and shall endeavour to ensure the widest possible participation of the communities, groups and, where applicable, individuals concerned as well as relevant non-governmental organizations during the process of preparing this report, and is asked to describe how it has done so in point D below.

B.1.

Social and cultural functions

Please explain the social and cultural functions and meanings of the element today, within and for its community, the characteristics of the bearers and practitioners, and any specific roles or categories of persons with special responsibilities towards the element, among others. Attention should be given to any relevant changes related to inscription criterion U.1 (‘the element constitutes intangible cultural heritage as defined in Article 2 of the Convention’).

This report concerns Safeguarding Empaako Tradition of the Batooro, Banyoro, Batuku, Batagwenda and Banyabindi of Western Uganda which, in 2013, was inscribed on the list of Intangible Cultural Heritage in Need of Urgent Safeguarding.
Empaako is a naming system whereby in addition to the family and given names, children are given one name from a fixed list of 12 collectively called Empaako and shared across communities. They include Okaali which is exclusively for a king, Araali, Acaali, Bbala, and Apuuli which are exclusively for males, and Ateenyi, Akiiki, Abwoli, Atwoki, Adyeri, Amooti and Abbooki which can be given either sex.
Empaako practice is transmitted through a naming ceremony which has several rituals that have slight variations from community to community. The meaning and interpretations of the rituals are linked to the value systems of these communities. In the naming ceremony, the paternal aunties receive the baby and examine its features. Any resemblance to the living or living dead relatives forms the basis of the choice of Empaako to give the baby.
After discussion on proposals, the clan head rules and declares the chosen Empaako by addressing it directly to the baby. A shared meal of millet and smoked beef follows, gifts are presented to the baby and tree or banana is planted in its honour.
In case of a child born outside own clan or an out sider who comes to live in a community, a ceremony which involves sharing Omwani (coffee barriers) and milk and kubukara (a reception ritual involving sitting on the lap of the head of clan to receive blessings) is organized.
In greeting, the two address each other using Empaako and one asks Empaako only on first interaction. Addressing using someone’s exact Empaako, affirms that 'I know and recognize you as person' since they are only 12 shares by entire society.
The use of Empaako helps to define and categorize a web of social relationships and interactions. Addressing using Empaako to a parent, an elder, a leader, a spirit medium or god is a declaration of respect and honour and to a lover, a tender minor, a sick, a suffering, a missed or dead dear one is an expression of love or affection. Empaako is also used in expressing thanks, bidding farewell and appealing for favour from both human and super human beings.
The Empaako is used to affirm human dignity and enforce the acceptable code of social conduct. For instance when some one is found in unacceptable behavior will be asked "Do you have Empaako? "This sends serious message of caution. In the minds of the bearer, addressing using Empaako suspends other factors in order to affirm the supremacy of the common principle of humanity. This is why addressing by Empaako has an effect of diffusing and neutralizing tension and anger and then Empaako is used as a tool in the mechanisms of community conflict mitigation and resolution.

B.2.

Assessment of its viability and current risks

Please describe the current level of viability of the element, particularly the frequency and extent of its practice, the strength of traditional modes of transmission, the demographics of practitioners and audiences and its sustainability. Please also identify and describe the threats, if any, to the element's continued transmission and enactment and describe the severity and immediacy of such threats, giving particular attention to any strengthening or weakening of the element’s viability subsequent to inscription.

Many people in Empaako Communities are increasingly losing knowledge and meaning of the naming ceremonies and the associated practices and as a result don’t give their children Empaako and the adults who already had it increasingly stop using it in daily life. Some of those who are still giving and using Empaako have abandoned the naming ceremonies and Empaako given without the naming ceremonies is culturally regarded as meaningless and indeed the cultural meaning of the practice is rooted in the naming ceremonies.

The knowledge of the Empaako naming ceremony has not been documented as the number of elders with such knowledge increasingly reduces. Any cultural knowledge that is only transmitted orally in these communities is not accessible to the young people.

However the nomination exercise, inscription and participatory elaboration of international assistance request for documentation of Empaako, has raided awareness and interest and as a result people begin to exchange and scale up existing knowledge and carryout some documentation at individual levels. This individual desire to document has been consolidated into the design of a comprehensive and broad participatory documentation project that will begin in 2018.

Two religious groups preach against Empaako practice and their followers, who are estimated to 700,000 people out of a population of 5,000,000, do not give Empaako to their children and abandon their own on the day of conversion. The raised awareness after inscription and unveiled meaning of the practice, are beginning to form base for appreciation of the practice and dialogue with those groups.

The language of Empaako practice has been declining and fashionable expressions from the advancing dominant languages were replacing the social roles of Empaako practice like greeting and expressing affection and respect. Inscription of Empaako has raised appreciation of the traditional culture and bearers begin to value their language and use it as much as possible.

B.3.

Implementation of safeguarding measures

Please report on the safeguarding measures described in the nomination file, and previous report, if any. Describe how they have been implemented and how they have substantially contributed to the safeguarding of the element during the reporting period, taking note of external or internal constraints such as limited resources. Include, in particular, information on the measures taken to ensure the viability of the element by enabling the community to continue to practise and transmit it. Include the following detailed information concerning the implementation of the set of safeguarding measures or safeguarding plan:

B.3.a. Objectives and results

Indicate what primary objective(s) were addressed and what concrete results were attained during the reporting period.

Primary Objectives addressed
1- Increasing availability and accessibility for the present and future generations, to knowledge and information about ceremonies and practices associated with Empaako naming system for its bearer communities.
2- Mobilization of practitioners and custodians of the traditional Empaako naming system for revitalization of performance of its associated ceremonies and observance of its practices.
3- Raising awareness of the bearers and stakeholders of the traditional Empaako naming system about its meaning and social values.
4- Adapting the meaning and social values of the traditional Empaako naming system to peace building and environmental sustainability programmes.
Results attained during the reporting period
1. An international assistance request on comprehensive documentation of ceremonies and practices as central safeguarding strategy successfully evaluated and approved for funding from the Intangible Cultural Heritage Fund.
2. An online platform for broad dissemination of documentation on Empaako naming system and sharing among bearers developed and launched.
3. Monthly clans’ representatives’ meeting and provision for space on agenda of individual clan assemblies consolidated as mechanisms for encouraging revitalization of Empaako naming ceremonies, sharing best practices and monitoring changes towards total restoration of viability of Empaako naming system.
4. The level of awareness and positive appreciation of the need to safeguard Empaako naming system increased among the bearers, resulting in micro-safeguarding actions at individual and small group levels.
5. Empaako Heritage Conservation Project which is using the meaning of Empaako naming system to promote environmental sustainability scaled up to 500 families.

B.3.b. Safeguarding activities

List the key activities that were carried out during this reporting period in order to achieve these expected results. Please describe the activities in detail and note their effectiveness or any problems encountered in implementing them.

1. Preparing for implementation of a project titled “Community-self documentation of ceremonies and practices associated with Empaako naming system in Uganda.” This was elaborated and submitted as an International Assistance Request targeting eighty percent co-funding from the UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage fund. Activities which prepared for its implementation has included; following the evaluation process at UNESCO and providing additional information as was being requested, mobilizing and preparing the twenty percentage communities and local government co-funding and consolidating the structures and mechanisms for its implementation.
2. The Empaako heritage conservation project which was initiated and piloted on a small scale in 2015, has been scaled up to cover more families. The project which is implemented in one of the give Empaako Communities and funded by the Cross Cultural Foundation of Uganda, involve using the planting of a tree as one of the rituals in Empaako naming ceremony to promote tree planting linked to environmental sustainability. The project avails tree seedlings to families to plant trees driven by beliefs and values of Empaako naming system. The number of participating families has grown to 500.
3. The monthly clans’ representative meetings has been consolidated and improved with new roles. They now share best practices in observing naming rituals in daily life of communities, report on changes as a result of raised awareness and have influenced provision of standing agenda item in individual clan assemblies, dedicated to encouraging observance of naming ceremonies whenever a child is born. It is also a standing consultation forum in elaborating proposals and reports.
4. Developing and launching Empaako platform www.empaako.org which is an online community and database of bearers of Empaako naming system. The platform is going to be an online repository of the outputs of the comprehensive documentation for broad sharing, dissemination and cultural engagement among the bearers of Empaako naming system both living in the land of Empaako and in diaspora. It will also enable sharing of cultural materials, information and forming subgroups for cooperation on cultural activities.
5. Guiding integration of education and information on Empaako naming system into routine community activities and processes.
Visual and performing artists have produced on Empaako naming system and now knowledge and information about it, are part of the daily community entertainment and informal education. The built monument in memory of Empaako inscription, in the main city in the land of Empaako, has evolved as a place of memory and cultural education and the community groups adopting it as identity symbol and a stop centre for visitors and tourists. All exhibitions at local and national levels have incorporated material items and symbols on Empaako naming system. This is in addition to all formal clan meetings, adopting a standing agenda item on encouraging revitalization of Empaako naming system as a niche of community’s identity and heritage. Guiding this integration has involved mobilizing the artists, interesting them into the theme, giving them the message to compose on and providing logistical facilitation as incentives.

6. Distribution of the developed brochure.
There has been wide distribution of the brochure which was produced as a summarized statement of Empaako naming system element because there is increasing search for information about the element by both the bearers and the visitors, following the inscriptions.

7. Weekly two hour radio talk show.
This is organized by Engabu Za Tooro NGO and attracts participation of all stakeholders. It is a forum of exchanging knowledge and information on safeguarding the Empaako and intangible Cultural Heritage in general.

8. Technical guidance and monitoring
The personnel of the department of Culture and Gender in the Ministry of Gender Labour and Social Development periodically move to the communities with a monitoring questionnaire to collect information on what is being done, give technical guidance and encouragement to practitioners and activity implementing groups. The collected information also feed into planning and report development.

As a challenge, the small group and individual safeguarding activities before a comprehensive participatory and focused documentation project have an aspect of distorting the overall safeguarding strategy of the element. It is only hoped that this challenge will be overcome when the main documentation project kicks off early 2018.

B.3.c. Participation of communities, groups or individuals in the safeguarding activities

Describe how communities, groups or, if appropriate, individuals as well as relevant non-governmental organizations have effectively participated, including in terms of gender roles, in the safeguarding measures. Describe the role of the implementing organization or body (name, background, etc.) and the human resources that were available for implementing safeguarding activities.

Representatives of community groups as clearly demonstrated in the statement of activities above, initiated, executed, and contributed funding to most of the activities done.
Engabu Za Tooro – Tooro Youth Platform for Action is a Ugandan NGO founded in 1999. Its mission is strengthening the capacity of communities through development of cultural enterprises and promotion of folk Art and indigenous knowledge research.
The organization is governed by a nine member Board of Directors and Annual General Meeting of 200 grassroots’ art and cultural groups, Youth, women and elders associations.
For the last 15 years it has continuously implemented projects in the areas of cultural research, documentation, inventorying, production of folklore, professionalizing cultural service providers and promotion of cultural enterprises and performing Arts.
The organization has been funded by the international partners including Hivos (Ten years), Common Wealth Foundation, Prince Claus Fund for Cultural and Development, CIDA, Concern Worldwide and Goal-Uganda among others.
It is a member of several national and international networks in the fields of Art and Culture. Since 2009 it has been accredited and participates, in observer capacity, in the discussions at WIPO aimed at establishing an international instrument for protection of genetic resources, traditional knowledge and cultural expressions. It was recommended in 2010 and subsequently accredited in 2012 to offer advisory services to the UNESCO’s Intergovernmental Committee for Safeguarding the ICH. Since then, it has participated in most of the convention’s statutory meetings, activities of the forum of the NGOs’ accredited to the committee and two international capacity building workshops on the convention. At national level, it has supported the State Party to implement the convention through raising awareness, facilitating several inventorying projects and facilitating nomination of two elements so far and both of which are inscribed, currently facilitating implementation of Post-inscription safeguarding programmes.
The organization is currently holding the chair of a national forum of researchers, experts and scholars of intangible cultural heritage which promotes understanding of ICH and implementation of its UNESCO Convention in the country.
Engabu Za Tooro currently has a core team of 4 senior staff and a net work of volunteers and consultants.
The roles of implementing organization has included the following among others
• Providing secretariat for coordination of stakeholders who include different participating community, government and NGO institutions, and UNESCO secretariat.
• Providing technical backing and facilitation to community- led safeguarding initiatives.
• Ensuring strategic focus and complementarily of different initiatives and contributions towards an effective general safeguarding programme.
• Ensuring financial and technical accountability to the activities that are centrally organized.

B.3.d. Timetable and budget

Indicate in a timetable when each activity was implemented and the funds that were used for its implementation, identifying the source of funding for each (governmental sources, in-kind community inputs, etc.).

TIME TABLE
Duration: April 2015 to December 2017
No. Activity Time Frame Responsible Institution(s)
1. Reviewing International Assistance Request.
Mobilizing local Co-funding June to Sept 2016

May to Dec. 2017 Engabu Za Tooro

Engabu Za Tooro
2. Empaako Heritage Conservation Project. April 2015 – Dec 2017 The Cross Cultural Foundation of Uganda, Bunyoro – Kitara Kingdom.
3. Monthly Clans’ meetings April 2015 – Dec 2017 Communities and Clans
4. Development & Launching Empaako platform. www.empaako.org
June to Dec 2016 Ultimate Media Consult & Engabu Za Tooro
5. Guiding integration of safeguarding into community processes. April 2015 to Dec 2017 Engabu Za Tooro
6. Distribution of Brochures April 2015 to Dec 2017 Engabu Za Tooro
7. Weekly radio talk shows. April 2015 to Dec 2017 KRC fm / Engabu Za Tooro & sponsoring companies
8. Monitoring & Technical guidance. April 2015 to Dec 2017 Min. of Gender, Labour and Social Development.



BUDGET.
Duration: April 2015 to December 2017
No. Activity Funds in US$ Sources
1. Reviewing International Assistance Request.
Mobilizing local Co-funding 2,000

500 Engabu Za Tooro

Engabu Za Tooro
2. Empaako heritage conservation Project. 5,000 The Cross Cultural Foundation of Uganda, Bunyoro – Kitara Kingdom.
3. Monthly Clans’ meetings 5,000 Communities and Clans’
4. Development & Launching Empaako platform. www.empaako.org
10,000 Ultimate Media Consult & Engabu Za Tooro
5. Guiding integration of safeguarding into community processes. 15,000 Engabu Za Tooro
6. Distribution of Brochures 500 Engabu Za Tooro
7. Weekly radio talk shows. 20,600 KRC fm / Engabu Za Tooro & sponsoring companies
8. Monitoring & Technical guidance. 8,000 Min. of Gender, Labour and Social Development.
Total 66,600

NOTE TO THE TIME TABLE AND BUDGET
The activities are in two categories;
Those which were centrally initiated and coordinated by the lead implementing agency like reviewing international assistance request, mobilizing local co-financing resources, monthly clans meetings, Development of Empaako platform, distribution of brochure, guiding integration and weekly radio talk shows.

Those initiated voluntarily by other stakeholders like Empaako heritage conservation project. These had theirown independent timetable and budgets. The exercise of elaboration of report only captured and incorporated summaries of their time and resource estimates.

B.3.e. Overall effectiveness of the safeguarding activities

Provide an overall assessment of the effectiveness of the activities undertaken to achieve the expected results and of the efficiency of the use of funds for implementing the activities. Please indicate how the activities contributed to achieving the results and whether other activities could have contributed better to achieving the same results. Also indicate whether the same results could have been achieved with less funding, whether the human resources available were appropriate and whether communities, groups and individuals could have been better involved.

This report covers the period of 2 years and 9 months from April 2015 to December 2017. As it can be noted, more activities could have been done in that period. The majority of activities done like monthly clans meetings, on going distribution of brochures, weekly radio programmes, and reviewing IAR are those that are easily integrated in the routine work of participating NGO’s and the communities. The only special actions were development of online platform and Empaako heritage conservation project. So the period was constrained by limited funding to be utilized efficiently.
The results make partial contribution towards the primary objectives they target which means more actions are needed to completely realize the objectives.
The results of this reporting period have prepared a good ground for a full scale project that will sufficiently realize most of the objectives of the overall safeguarding plan.
Reviewing the IAR submitted to UNESCO and which is on comprehensive documentation and realizing its approval is a partial result, contributing to the objective of increasing availability of and accessibility to knowledge of the practice for the present and future generations. It equally laid the ground for capacity building of the practitioners, mobilization for revitalization of the ceremonies and practices and raising the awareness, all of which are key components of the intended project.
Development of Empaako platform was strategic to prepare and build towards impactful documentation, dissemination, raising awareness and mobilization of the bearers.
This online project for sharing was also cost effective in the situation of limited resources.
The Empaako heritage development project piloted in one community is building towards the objective of integrating the cultural meaning of Empaako naming system to programming on peace building and environmental sustainability. However, this action being piloted in only one of the five participating communities, is too limited and need to be scaled up to more communities. Moreover in the overall safeguarding plan as presented at inscription and later revised, the result of integration of the element in those sustainable development issues, is supposed to be realized last in the chronological order.
The element need to be first sufficient restored through comprehensive documentation, awareness raising, capacity building, mobilization for revitalization and contributing to strengthening development of its language, before its meaning can be adapted and used in sustainable development issues. The plan which is supposed to attract contribution from diverse sources cannot centrally be controlled on what should be done and when. Using the meaning of this practice to pursue sustainable development issues, is an aspect that can attract participants who even may not be in the cultural sector and who cannot be attracted by the direct cultural actions like documentation. Yet those who can fund the direct cultural actions like government and UNESCO have procedures which take long.
However with the UNESCO approval of a documentation project to begin early 2018, this challenge is now-overcome.
The inscription of Empaako naming system and subsequent safeguarding activities, have raised awareness beyond the five participating communities. More communities even beyond the territory of Uganda and particularly in the Democratic Republic of Congo have claimed that they are also bearers of Empaako naming system and would like to be included in the inscription file. Inventory and nomination of ICH element, is demand driven from the concerned communities and such communities need to have information before a demand is generated in them. Making use of paragraph 16-19 of the Operational Directives, a fresh nomination of a multi national file on an extended basis, to cover those communities, may be carried out alongside implementation of the current safeguarding plan.

C. Update of the safeguarding measures

C.1.

Updated safeguarding plan

Please provide an update of the safeguarding plan included in the nomination file or in the previous report. In particular provide detailed information as follows:

  1. a. What primary objective(s) will be addressed and what concrete results will be expected?
  2. b. What are the key activities to be carried out in order to achieve these expected results? Describe the activities in detail and in their best sequence, addressing their feasibility.
  3. c. How will the State(s) Party(ies) concerned support the implementation of the updated safeguarding plan?

a) Primary Objectives
1- Increasing availability of and accessibility to information and knowledge of ceremonies and practices associated with Empaako naming system for its bearer communities for the present and future generations.
2- Strengthening of the capacity of the practitioners and custodians of the traditional Empaako naming system, to transmit to successive generations, its knowledge, skills, meaning and social values.
3- Mobilization of practitioners and custodians of the traditional Empaako naming system for revitalization of performance of its associated ceremonies and observance of its associated practices.
4- Raising awareness of the bearers and stakeholders of the traditional Empaako naming system about its meaning and social values.
5- Contributing to competitive development of the language of the traditional Empaako naming system.
6- Adapting the meaning and values of the traditional Empaako naming system to peace building and environmental sustainability programmes.
7- Extending the scope of inscription and its resultant safeguarding programmes to bearer communities in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Results
1- Increased availability of and accessibility for the present and future generations to knowledge of ceremonies and practices associated with the traditional Empaako naming system for its bearer communities.
2- Strengthened capacity of the bearers of the traditional Empaako naming system to transmit to successive generations, Its knowledge, skills, meaning and social values.
3- The practitioners and custodians of the traditional Empaako naming system, mobilized for revitalization of performance of its associated ceremonies and observance of its associated practices.
4- Raised awareness of the bearers and stakeholders of the traditional Empaako naming system about its meaning and social values.
5- Realized contribution to the competitive development of the vernacular of the traditional Empaako naming system.
6- The meaning and social values of the traditional Empaako naming system adapted to programming for environmental sustainability and peace building.
7- The scope of inscription and its resultant safeguarding programmes extended to the bearer communities of traditional Empaako naming system in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
b) Activities
1- Capacity building workshops of stakeholders and practitioners.
This will involve giving skills for documentation of ICH and sharing knowledge and skills for performing Empaako naming ceremonies. This will be preceded by developing a practical guide and TOT workshop.
2- Comprehensive documentation of knowledge of ceremonies and practices associated with Empaako naming system.
This will include data collection and processing on ceremonies and practices associated with Empaako naming system and producing a video, a document and art pieces.

3- Broad dissemination of documented knowledge through electronic media, formal education and online media.

4- Monthly clan’s representatives meetings.
This will be a regular forum of critical practitioners to review progress of safeguarding activities, observance of naming ceremonies and continuous planning, monitoring and sharing.
5- Weekly radio talk shows.
This will be a forum for participation of a wide community through listening and phone calling and sharing knowledge on the safeguarding of Empaako naming system.
6- Linking safeguarding of Empaako naming system to education and information institutions.
This will involve linking the outputs of documentation to curriculum development and education institutions for adoption as educational material in language, art and cultural education and training. This will also involve linking the output of documentation to library, museum and theatre institutions for adoption for informal education and entertainment.
7- Granting training scholarship to produce 20 Runyoro Rutooro language professionals to contribute to the preservation of the language where Empaako naming system finds expression and continuity.
8- Linking the cultural meaning of the traditional Empaako naming system to peace and environmental programing.
Training meetings will be organized with relevant NGO to sensitize them on how to adapt the cultural meaning of Empaako naming system to re-enforce design of project on environmental sustainability and peace building
1. To re-nominate and re-submit the traditional Empaako naming system as multi-national file with extended scope to include bearer communities in the DRC.
2. Monitoring and technical guidance

c) How the State Party concerned will support the implementation of the plan.
The relevant officers of the local governments which are covering the communities concerned with Empaako naming system, will form ICH Safeguarding committees which will manage a process of incorporating safeguarding of ICH in their Local Government Plans and Budgets and hence secure funding contribution to the safeguarding plan of Empaako naming system. These committees will also link up and be part of the monitoring committees for projects implementing this safeguarding plan.
The ministry in charge of Culture and Relevant National Government Institutions; including National Curriculum Development Centre, National Cultural Center, National Museum, National theatre and Uganda libraries Board, will provide technical guidance, monitoring support, distribution and knowledge dissemination infrastructure and support integration of documentation outputs into training and education system.

d) UPDATED OVER ALL WORK PLAN 2015 – 2019
DESCRIPTION ACTIVITY NUMBER TIME FRAME YEAR/MONTH
Capacity building actions 1 January 2018 – December 2018
Documentation of ceremonies and practices 2 January 2019 – December 2019
Broad dissemination actions 3 January 2018 – December 2019
Monthly clans meeting 4 January 2015 – December 2019
Weekly radio talk shows 5 January 2015 – December 2019
Linking safeguarding to education 6 January 2018 – December 2019
Giving scholarship for language professionals 7 January 2017 – December 2019
Linking Empaako meaning to peace and environmental programing 8 January 2015 – December 2019
Nomination on extended basis. 9 January 2018 – December 2019
Technical guidance and monitoring 10 April 2015 – December 2019

BUDGET ESTIMATES
DESCRIPTION ACTIVITY NUMBER AMOUNT IN US$
Capacity building actions 1 185,720
Documentation of ceremonies and practices 2 68,250
Broad dissemination actions 3 31,340
Monthly clan meeting 4 9,150
Weekly radio talk shows 5 37,200
Linking safeguarding to education 6 8,000
Giving scholarship for language professionals 7 40,000
Linking Empaako meaning to peace and environmental programing 8 8,000
Nomination on extended basis. 9 15,000
Technical guidance and monitoring 10 33,000
Grand Total 435,660

Sources
1. Government institutions – Personnel, Venues, Funds
2. Intangible Cultural Heritage Fund – Funds (US 232,120)
3. Engabu Za Tooro – Personnel, Venue, Rent, Equipment
4. Clans and Community Institutions – Services, Funds, Venues
5. Cross Cultural Foundation of Uganda – Project Funds
6. Sponsors.

C.2.

Community participation

Please describe how communities, groups and individuals, as well as relevant non-governmental organizations have been involved, including in terms of gender roles, in updating the safeguarding plan, and how they will be involved in its implementation.

The communities of Batooro, Banyoro, Batuku, Batagwenda and Banyabindi are represented by the 44 clan institutions of which membership cut across all the five communities. There are also represented by cultural institutions like chiefdoms and Kingdoms and voluntary community associations. These do not apply uniformly in all communities but each community has at least one of the above community collective mechanisms. The clan leaders represented up to family unit are the custodians of the community’s intangible cultural heritage. They cause and lead all traditional rituals and cultural ceremonies in the communities. Their mission is to ensure practice and transmission of the community’s intangible cultural heritage. Clans, collectively forms Cultural Institutions like Chiefdoms.

The community institutions have initiated, organized and contributed to financing of most of all the activities done so far, as illustrated hereunder;
• The general safeguarding plan and international assistance requests were developed by clan leaders, facilitated by the expert from Engabu Za Tooro NGO,
• All the festivals and events for awareness raising and launching safeguarding plans were initiated and organized by clan and community associations. Officials from the ministry and Engabu Za Tooro NGO were invited to facilitate.
• Empaako heritage conservation project was conceived and implemented by officials of Bunyoro Kitara kingdom with funding from Cross Cultural Foundation of Uganda.
• Community-based music and visual artists initiated and executed the production of music and monument as their contribution to raising awareness and encouraging the communities to revitalize observance of ceremonies and practices.
The project management structure and mechanisms established to provide governance and monitoring of the safeguarding programme include representative of community institutions.

C.3.

Institutional context

Please report on the institutional context for the local management and safeguarding of the element inscribed on the Urgent Safeguarding List, including:

  1. a. the competent body(ies) involved in its management and/or safeguarding;
  2. b. the organization(s) of the community or group concerned with the element and its safeguarding.

The competent bodies involved in management and facilitating Safeguarding Empaako element include; Engabu Za Tooro – Tooro Youth Platform for Action, a 15 years old cultural NGO, accredited to the IGC of the 2003 UNESCO Convention. The second is the Department of Culture and Family Affairs of the Ministry of Gender Labour and Social Development.

The community organizations concerned with Empaako element include, the 44 clan institutions currently having a monthly clans representative forum on the safeguarding concerns, Tooro Kingdom, Bunyoro Kingdom and Banyabindi culture and Development Trust.

D. Participation of communities in preparing this report

Describe the measures taken to ensure the widest possible participation of the communities, groups and, where applicable, individuals concerned as well as relevant non-governmental organizations during the process of preparing this report.

A facilitator was identified by the implementing organization to coordinate and compile this report with the participation of the communities.
Updating meetings were organized by the leaders of the participating community institutions in the five participating communities. These leaders included the Executive of Banyabindi Culture and Development Trust, Ekoomi ya Batuku and contact persons for Batagwenda, Tooro Kingdom and Bunyoro Kingdom. The meetings facilitated by the expert, generated information on what the communities feel they have accomplished and the challenges that were met. This information fed into the draft report which was sent back to the communities through their contact persons for comments. The comments received from the communities were considered before a final draft was compiled. The established monthly clan representative forum that convene in Fort-Portal discussed this first report as an agenda item on two sittings.
The first meeting generated information for the report and the second considered the draft report. Through the activities executives the staff of the Ministry of Gender Labour and Social Development independently collected information provided by the communities which also fed into the process of report development.

E. Signature on behalf of the State Party

The report should be signed by an official empowered to do so on behalf of the State, and should include his or her name, title and the date of submission.

Name

Title

Date

Signature

Upload signed version in PDF


Periodic Report (USL)

Cover sheet

State Party

Name of State Party

Uganda

Date of deposit of the instrument of ratification, acceptance, approval or accession

This information is available online.

13-05-2009

Element inscribed on the Urgent Safeguarding List that is the subject of this report

Name of element

Empaako tradition of the Batooro, Banyoro, Batuku, Batagwenda and Banyabindi of western Uganda

Inscribed in

2013

Reporting period covered by this report

Please indicate the period covered by this report.

12-2013 - 03-2015

Other elements inscribed on the Urgent Safeguarding List, if any

Please list all other elements from your country inscribed on the Urgent Safeguarding List, together with the year of inscription; for multinational elements, please indicate the other States concerned.

Bigwala, gourd trumpet music and dance of the Busoga Kingdom in Uganda (2012)
Empaako tradition of the Batooro, Banyoro, Batuku, Batagwenda and Banyabindi of western Uganda (2013)
Herbal healing practices among the Basoga people of eastern Uganda (2013)
Koogere oral tradition of the Basongora, Banyabindi and Batooro peoples (2015)
Ma'di bowl lyre music and dance (2016)
Male-child cleansing ceremony of the Lango of central northern Uganda (2014)
The culture of the Ik people of North-Eastern Uganda (-)

Executive summary of the report

Please provide an executive summary of the report that will allow general readers to understand the current status of the element, any positive or negative impacts of inscription, the implementation of safeguarding measures during the reporting period and their possible update for the following years.

On 4th December 2013, Empaako tradition of Batooro, Banyoro, Batagwenda, Batuku and Banyabindi of western Uganda was inscribed on the urgent safeguarding list. In the decision, the committee provided for an extra ordinary report to be submitted for consideration during the committees 10th session in November 2015.

Empaako is a naming system whereby in addition to family and given name, a child is given Empaako from a list of 12 of them shared by entire society. The practice is associated with rituals and ceremonies of which meaning form the niche of identity and belief systems of the concerned communities.

This report covers 16 months from the date of inscription in December 2013 to its submission in March 2015.
The period under review focused on resource mobilization activities, involving review of the safeguarding plan to address the gaps identified at inscription and developing international assistance request to UNESCO and other international sources. A structure and mechanism for effective community and stakeholder participation has been established and commissioned. The inscription has attracted contributions mainly from local and national sources, laying a foundation for implementation of a comprehensive and multi-stakeholders safeguarding plan.

According to the design of the reviewed safeguarding plan, raising awareness, comprehensive documentation of rituals, ceremonies and practices and mobilizing clans for revitalization of observance of these ceremonies, are the core activities and in appropriate progressive order. However different aspects of the element can attract supplementary interventions to build on the core activities and scale up the safeguarding impact.

In the period under review, many activities have been implemented which have, raised the awareness of the communities and national stakeholders on Empaako tradition and the need to safeguard it. Such activities have included national press conference, publication of brochure, organization of festivals and production of artistic expressions among others. The raising of awareness has set the ground for the documentation effort which is proposed in the international assistance request submitted to UNESCO.

In the period under review also a couple of activities have been implemented aimed at mobilizing clan and ritual leaders to revive the observance of empaako naming ceremonies. Such activities included the monthly clan’s representative forum and the Kings’ and Cultural Leaders’ pronouncements, encouraging their followers to revive observance of the ceremonies.

Inscription attracted diverse contributions but many institutions tend to identify and adopt aspects of Empaako tradition which easily link to their mandate but not necessarily the identified core safeguarding activities like documentation and revitalization. Aspects of Empaako tradition link very well to sustainable development issues like peace building, conflict resolution and environmental sustainability. While adopting the heritage to those issues may scale-up the safeguarding impact, if it comes before implementation of core activities, may distort the systematic progress of implementation of an effective safeguarding programme.
While the activities of raising awareness, fundraising and establishing mechanisms and programme structure, have assembled sufficient efforts for an effective safeguarding programme, they have not yet translated to significant changes to the viability of Empaako Tradition.

The practice is still faced with losing of knowledge of rituals and ceremonies with the attendant meaning and social values among the bearers. This relates also to the decline in observance of the naming ceremonies and consequently reducing numbers of people who transmit and use them in daily life. The attack of the practice from some religious groups, mainly because of lack of knowledge about it’s meaning can still be observed. In addition, also there is diminishing use of its traditional language in favour of upcoming dominant languages with expressions replacing the roles of Empaako practice.

Contact person for correspondence

Provide the name, address and other contact information of the person responsible for correspondence concerning the report.

Title (Ms/Mr, etc.)

Mr

Family name

Rwagweri

Given name

Stephen

Institution/position

Engabu Za Tooro – Tooro Youth Platform for Action

Address

P.O.Box 886, Fort-Portal Uganda

Telephone number

+256 772 469751

Fax number

E-mail address

engabuzatooro@gmail.com

Other relevant information


B. Status of element inscribed on the Urgent Safeguarding List

Refer to the nomination file or to previous reports, if any, as the basis for reporting on the current status of the element, and report only on relevant changes since the date of inscription on the List or since the previous report. Nomination files, specific timetables and earlier reports, if any, are available at https://ich.unesco.org or from the Secretariat, upon request.

The State Party shall pay special attention to the role of gender and shall endeavour to ensure the widest possible participation of the communities, groups and, where applicable, individuals concerned as well as relevant non-governmental organizations during the process of preparing this report, and is asked to describe how it has done so in point D below.

B.1. Social and cultural functions

Please explain the social and cultural functions and meanings of the element today, within and for its community, the characteristics of the bearers and practitioners, and any specific roles or categories of persons with special responsibilities towards the element, among others. Attention should be given to any relevant changes related to inscription criterion U.1 (‘the element constitutes intangible cultural heritage as defined in Article 2 of the Convention’).

This report concerns Safeguarding Empaako Tradition of the Batooro, Banyoro, Batuku, Batagwenda and Banyabindi of Western Uganda which, in 2013, was inscribed on the list of Intangible Cultural Heritage in Need of Urgent Safeguarding.
Empaako is a naming system whereby in addition to the family and given names, children are given one name from a fixed list of 12 collectively called Empaako and shared across communities. They include Okaali which is exclusively for a king, Araali, Acaali, Bbala, and Apuuli which are exclusively for males, and Ateenyi, Akiiki, Abwoli, Atwoki, Adyeri, Amooti and Abbooki which can be given either sex.
Empaako practice is transmitted through a naming ceremony which has several rituals that have slight variations from community to community. The meaning and interpretations of the rituals are linked to the value systems of these communities. In the naming ceremony, the paternal aunties receive the baby and examine its features. Any resemblance to the living or living dead relatives forms the basis of the choice of Empaako to give the baby.
After discussion on proposals, the clan head rules and declares the chosen Empaako by addressing it directly to the baby. A shared meal of millet and smoked beef follows, gifts are presented to the baby and tree or banana is planted in its honour.

In case of a child born outside own clan or an out sider who comes to live in a community, a ceremony which involves sharing Omwani (coffee barriers) and milk and kubukara (a reception ritual involving sitting on the lap of the head of clan to receive blessings) is organized.
In greeting, the two address each other using Empaako and one asks Empaako only on first interaction. Addressing using someone’s exact Empaako, affirms that 'I know and recognize you as person' since they are only 12 shares by entire society.
The use of Empaako helps to define and categorize a web of social relationships and interactions. Addressing using Empaako to a parent, an elder, a leader, a spirit medium or god is a declaration of respect and honour and to a lover, a tender minor, a sick, a suffering, a missed or dead dear one is an expression of love or affection. Empaako is also used in expressing thanks, bidding farewell and appealing for favour from both human and super human beings.
The Empaako is used to affirm human dignity and enforce the acceptable code of social conduct. For instance when some one is found in unacceptable behavior will be asked "Do you have Empaako? "This sends serious message of caution. In the minds of the bearer, addressing using Empaako suspends other factors in order to affirm the supremacy of the common principle of humanity. This is why addressing by Empaako has an effect of diffusing and neutralizing tension and anger and then Empaako is used as a tool in the mechanisms of community conflict mitigation and resolution.

B.2. Assessment of its viability and current risks

Please describe the current level of viability of the element, particularly the frequency and extent of its practice, the strength of traditional modes of transmission, the demographics of practitioners and audiences and its sustainability. Please also identify and describe the threats, if any, to the element's continued transmission and enactment and describe the severity and immediacy of such threats, giving particular attention to any strengthening or weakening of the element’s viability subsequent to inscription.

Empaako is still faced with threats to its viability.
Some people from the traditional Empaako communities no longer give Empaako to their children and no longer use it in their daily lives. Majority of those who are still giving Empaako to their children and using it in daily life, have abandoned the naming rituals. They have lost the knowledge and meaning of the Empaako naming ceremonies and beliefs, practices and social values associated there with.
The knowledge of the naming ceremony is not documented as the number of elders with such knowledge reduces. In these communities any knowledge which is only transmitted orally, is currently not accessible to the young generation.
The cultural meaning and value of Empaako is rooted in the naming rituals. The Empaako received without carryout the ceremony does not carry the attendant meaning and value and is culturally dismissed as illegitimate. Members of the community ask the bearer of such ”Empaako Yaawe Bakagiriira oburo?” (Was the ceremonial millet meal taken for that Empaako of yours?) while dismissing it as valueless.
Two religious cults preach against Empaako and their followers do not give Empaako to their children and abandon their own Empaako on the day of conversion. These religious groups have an estimated number of 700,000= followers in the Empaako communities. The attack on the tradition thrives on mainly gross lack of information about its meaning and social values. Documentation can avail information that can facilitate dialogue with such groups.
The language of Empaako tradition (Runyoro-Rutooro) is declining in usage even among its own traditional communities. Fashionable expressions from advancing dominant languages are replacing some roles of Empaako practice especially among the Youth.

B.3. Implementation of safeguarding measures

Please report on the safeguarding measures described in the nomination file, and previous report, if any. Describe how they have been implemented and how they have substantially contributed to the safeguarding of the element during the reporting period, taking note of external or internal constraints such as limited resources. Include, in particular, information on the measures taken to ensure the viability of the element by enabling the community to continue to practise and transmit it. Include the following detailed information concerning the implementation of the set of safeguarding measures or safeguarding plan:

B.3.a. Objectives and results

Indicate what primary objective(s) were addressed and what concrete results were attained during the reporting period.

General objectives
1. Increasing accessibility and availability, for the present and future generations, of information and knowledge of ceremonies and practices associated with Empaako naming system for it’s five communities in Uganda.
2. Enhancing the capacity of bearers of the traditional Empaako naming system to transmit, to successive generations, it’s knowledge, meaning and social values through appropriate observance of its ceremonies and practices.
Specific Objectives
1- Participatory review of the general safeguarding plan in light of the gaps identified during inscription.
2- Establishing structure and mechanisms for effective community and stakeholders participation in safeguarding programme.
3- Establishing strategy for raising the required resources for implementation of the safe guarding plan.
4- Raising awareness of the communities and stakeholders on Empaako tradition and the need to safeguard it.
5- Mobilizing clans and ritual leaders to revitalize observance of Empaako naming rituals and ceremonies.
Results attained in the reporting period.
1- The safeguarding plan reviewed in light of the gaps identified at inscription and launched.
2- Safeguarding programme structure and mechanisms for effective community and stakeholders’ participation in implementation of safeguarding plan established and commissioned.
3- A strategy for raising resources from local, national and international sources established and requests developed and submitted to UNESCO and two other potential supplementary donors.
4- The awareness of the communities and stakeholders in Empaako tradition and need to safeguard it, raised through three festivals, pubic event involving the president, artistic productions (music and monument) and publication of brochure.
5- The leaders of rituals and 44 clans mobilized, to revitalize observance of naming ceremonies through the established monthly clans representative forum and pronouncement of Kings and Cultural Leaders.

B.3.b. Safeguarding activities

List the key activities that were carried out during this reporting period in order to achieve these expected results. Please describe the activities in detail and note their effectiveness or any problems encountered in implementing them.

1- Reviewing of the safeguarding plan.
A stakeholders participatory process to review a general safeguarding plan was initiated in December 2013 immediately after inscription. This aimed at addressing the gaps and strengthening the plan which was evaluated at inscription stage. An expert was engaged who facilitated the communities to come up with the plan. The process was coordinated and funded by Engabu Za Tooro – Tooro Youth Platform for Action and received financial contributions from clans in Empaako communities.
2- In the same participatory way the International Assistance Request tailored to the technical specifications of Intangible Cultural Heritage Fund was elaborated and submitted to UNESCO. This request titled “Community Self-documental and revitalization of ceremonies and practices associated with Empaako naming system in Uganda” focuses on comprehensive documentation of rituals, Ceremonies and practices by practitioners themselves alongside established mechanisms for encouraging revitalization.
3- Two proposals, picking on specific aspects of the safeguarding plan tailored to specific requirements of particular potential donors, have also been submitted for possible supplementary resources to implement the plan.
4- An implementation structure and mechanisms for effective participation of communities and stakeholders has been established and commissioned. It includes a Project Management Committee constituted by stakeholders from government, NGOs and community institutions. It is structured from community to central level. Alongside this, a monthly clans’ representatives forum is established as a communication, consultative and advisory organ.
5- A three months pilot Empaako heritage conservation project was implemented by Banyoro communities. This project involved using aspect of planting a true during Empaako naming ceremonies to promote tree planting linked to environmental sustainability. The project is intended to scale up in its subsequent phases.
6- Three festivals were held in three communities on the theme of celebrating inscription and launching safeguarding plan. They include Banyabindi Empaako festival at Kinyamasoke 28th – 29th November 2014, Batuku festival at Rwebisengo 26 – 27 December 2014 and Batooro Empaako inscription celebrations on 17th June 2014. These events raised awareness on the need to safeguard Empaako heritage and cultural leaders used the forum to make pronouncements encouraging their followers to revive observance of the ceremonies and practices of Empaako heritage.
7- A brochure on the process of inscription and lay out of the safeguarding plan was produced and distributed to guide and inform community members on how safeguarding plan is progressing.
8- A monthly clans’ representative forum which started during nomination campaign was consolidated and focused on reviewing safeguarding plan, developing proposals and trickling down information to grassroots and mobilizing clans and ritual leaders to revitalize observance of naming ritual and ceremonies.
9- The inscription attracted different talent groups to express themselves on the social significance of Empaako heritage and contributed to raising awareness of the need to revive the ceremonies and practices. Performing Artists produced and launched three music items and the visual artists raised a monument in memory of inscription in Fort Portal, the biggest town in Empaako land.
10- The Ministry of Gender, Labour and Social Development organized a national press conference presided over by the minister, to inform the country about the inscription and raise awareness about the need for safeguarding the element. The same message was passed on during several regional and national cultural workshops organized or presided over by the ministry. The ministry staff further visited communities to monitor implementation of safeguarding and established communication channels and reporting format and schedule.
11- The Batooro community organized a function presided over by the President of the Republic of Uganda and cultural leaders to officially acknowledge the certificate of inscription from UNESCO and pass it over to the communities. In his remarks, the president called on leaders in all categories of institutions to encourage communities to safeguard heritage for consolidation of national identity and development.
As a challenge the supplementary funding sources tend to pick on aspects of the safeguarding plan which easily link to their own focus and which are at a higher level in the systematic progress of implementation of the plan. This may attract efforts that are not systematically built. Documentation which is the core activity in the safeguarding plan do not easily link to mandates of supplementary funding sources and the targeted core funding from either government or UNESCO may over delay because completing priorities and long application processes.

B.3.c. Participation of communities, groups or individuals in the safeguarding activities

Describe how communities, groups or, if appropriate, individuals as well as relevant non-governmental organizations have effectively participated, including in terms of gender roles, in the safeguarding measures. Describe the role of the implementing organization or body (name, background, etc.) and the human resources that were available for implementing safeguarding activities.

Representatives of community groups as clearly demonstrated in the statement of activities above, initiated executed, and contributed funding to most of the activities done.
Engabu Za Tooro – Tooro Youth Platform for Action is a Ugandan NGO founded in 1999. Its mission is strengthening the capacity of communities through development of cultural enterprises and promotion of folk Art and indigenous knowledge research.
The organization is governed by a nine member Board of Directors and Annual General Meeting of 200 grassroots’ art and cultural groups, Youth, women and elders associations.
For the last 15 years it has continuously implemented projects in the areas of cultural research, documentation, inventorying, production of folklore, professionalizing cultural service providers and promotion of cultural enterprises and performing Arts.
The organization has been funded by the international partners including Hivos (Ten years), Common Wealth Foundation, Prince Claus Fund for Cultural and Development, CIDA, Concern Worldwide and Goal-Uganda among others.
It is a member of several national and international networks in the fields of Art and Culture. Since 2009 it has been accredited and participates, in observer capacity, in the discussions at WIPO aimed at establishing an international instrument for protection of genetic resources, traditional knowledge and cultural expressions. It was recommended in 2010 and subsequently accredited in 2012 to offer advisory services to the UNESCO’s Intergovernmental Committee for Safeguarding the ICH. Since then, it has participated in most of the convention’s statutory meetings, activities of the forum of the NGOs’ accredited to the committee and two international capacity building workshops on the convention. At national level, it has supported the State Party to implement the convention through raising awareness, facilitating several inventorying projects and facilitating nomination of two elements so far and one of which is inscribed, currently facilitating implementation of Post-inscription safeguarding programmes.
The organization is currently holding the chair of a national forum of researchers, experts and scholars of intangible cultural heritage which promotes understanding of ICH and implementation of its UNESCO Convention in the country.
Engabu Za Tooro currently has a core team of 4 senior staff and a net work of volunteers and consultants.
The roles of implementing organization has included the following among others
• Providing secretariat for coordination of stakeholders who include different participating community, government and NGO institutions, and UNESCO secretariat.
• Providing technical backing and facilitation to community- led safeguarding initiatives.
• Ensuring strategic focus and complementarily of different initiatives and contributions towards an effective general safeguarding programme.
• Ensuring financial and technical accountability to the activities that are centrally organized.

B.3.d. Timetable and budget

Indicate in a timetable when each activity was implemented and the funds that were used for its implementation, identifying the source of funding for each (governmental sources, in-kind community inputs, etc.).

Duration: 16 months from December 2013 to March 2015

Activity Month(s) & year Funds
(US $) Source of Funding
National Press Conference December 2013 Government
Reviewing safeguarding plan Jan 2014 – May 2014 20,000 - Engabu Za Tooro
- Communities.
Developing a Brochure June 2014 1,000 NGO – Engabu Za Tooro
Producings Music items March – July 2014 6,000 NGOs
Building monument May – July 2014 10,000 Bayimba Cultural Foundation-Artists
Empaako heritage conservation project August – Oct 2014 3,600 Cross cultural Foundation of Uganda
Batooro Empaako festival July 2014 9,000 Engabu Za Tooro & Communities
Banyabindi Empaako festival November 2014 3,000 Community
Batuku Annual Cultural festival December 2014 2,500 Community
Elaborating international Assistance request May 2014 – March 2015 10,000 Engabu Za Tooro
Twerwaneho Listeners’ Club
10 Clans
Developing proposal to two Donors Jan to March 2015 3,000 Engabu Za Tooro
Establishing structure and mechanism May 20 –Dec 2014 7,000 Government
Monthly Clan representative forum Dec 2013 – March 2015 25,000 NGOs
Communities
Monitoring and technical guidance Dec 2014 – March 2015 Government

The activities are in two categories;
Those which were centrally initiated and coordinated like review of Safeguarding Plan, Proposal development, establishing structures and mechanisms, clan representatives forum, development of brochure and general monitoring. There were also activities which were initiated by diverse voluntary stakeholders and targeting one or two communities.
These worked out their own time table at community level although coordinating with the secretariat. This work plan therefore combines the two activity categories and summarizes the individual work plans of specific activities.

B.3.e Overall effectiveness of the safeguarding activities

Provide an overall assessment of the effectiveness of the activities undertaken to achieve the expected results and of the efficiency of the use of funds for implementing the activities. Please indicate how the activities contributed to achieving the results and whether other activities could have contributed better to achieving the same results. Also indicate whether the same results could have been achieved with less funding, whether the human resources available were appropriate and whether communities, groups and individuals could have been better involved.

It is important to note that the current report covers 16 months from the date of inscription to the submission of this report. (4th December 2013 to 30th March 2015). The activities therefore have an effect on raising awareness of the communities and the general society on the inscription of Empaako element and the need to safeguard it. This is the first and fundamental step envisaged in the Safeguarding Plan. The second area of effect under the constraint of this reporting time frame can only be launching of the Safeguarding plan and starting off efforts for revitalization of observance of ceremonies.

The activities and strategies based on the reporting period were very effective to raising awareness, not only on safeguarding the Empaako element in question but also intangible cultural heritage of the communities in general. The impact was not on the targeted concerned Empaako communities only but also on the general population of Uganda.

The monthly clans representative forum which receive information, discuss and plan safeguarding activities, have been effective in trickling down information and learning to the grassroots. Therefore the awareness of the grassroots people who are the bearers and custodians of the heritage was sufficiently raised. The organization of public events like national press conference, festivals and activities involving public leaders scaled up the awareness raising impact. It also underscored the importance of safeguarding intangible cultural heritage as a concern that is crosscutting all sections of society.

The contribution of performing and visual artists by adopting the message into their products opened up the spreading of safeguarding initiatives into all human talent areas, professions and activities. Moreover, their artistic products make the message permanently present or visible. The monument, for instance, raised in the center of the biggest town is now a place of memory, reflection and cultural education where people continuously gather and take memorable photographs. The brochure put the concrete message of the intended safeguarding plan on record, making it easily accessible and transferable.

The safeguarding plan, designed using a participatory approach and attracting diverse contributions both in the design and implementation, was effectively developed. However tasks that wholly targeted funding from community contributions, suffered disjointed implementation as contributions come in bits and such tasks can only survive on services of community volunteers but not hired consultants, experts and commercial service providers.

A general safeguarding plan that allows diverse contributions from diverse sources may face ca the focus and systematic progress. For instance pilot project which uses one of the rituals to promote planting of trees would better have come after implementation of documentation of rituals and meanings of the ceremonies. While it is not easy to get a funder of a project on documentation, except from government or UNESCO, it is easy to get one on using the heritage to promote peace building, conflict resolution or environmental sustainability which are aspects of the element. Yet in the proper progress of safeguarding plan those aspects should come after awareness raising, documentation and revitalization of observance of ceremonies.

B.4. Community participation

Please describe how communities, groups and individuals, as well as relevant non-governmental organizations have been involved, including in terms of gender roles, in updating the safeguarding plan, and how they will be involved in its implementation.

The communities of Batooro, Banyoro, Batuku, Batagwenda and Banyabindi are represented by the 44 clan institutions of which membership cut across all the five communities. There are also represented by cultural institutions like chiefdoms and Kingdoms and voluntary community associations. These do not apply uniformly in all communities but each community has at least one of the above community collective mechanisms. The clan leaders represented up to family unit are the custodians of the community’s intangible cultural heritage. They cause and lead all traditional rituals and cultural ceremonies in the communities. Their mission is to ensure practice and transmission of the community’s intangible cultural heritage. Clans, collectively forms Cultural Institutions like Chiefdoms.

The community institutions have initiated, organized and contributed to financing of most of all the activities done so far, as illustrated hereunder;
• The general safeguarding plan and international assistance requests were developed by clan leaders, facilitated by the expert from Engabu Za Tooro NGO,
• All the festivals and events for awareness raising and launching safeguarding plans were initiated and organized by clan and community associations. Officials from the ministry and Engabu Za Tooro NGO were invited to facilitate.
• Empaako heritage conservation project was conceived and implemented by officials of Bunyoro Kitara kingdom with funding from Cross Cultural Foundation of Uganda.
• Community-based music and visual artists initiated and executed the production of music and monument as their contribution to raising awareness and encouraging the communities to revitalize observance of ceremonies and practices.
• The project management structure and mechanisms established to provide governance and monitoring of the safeguarding programme include representative of community institutions.

B.5. Institutional context

Please report on the institutional context for the local management and safeguarding of the element inscribed on the Urgent Safeguarding List, including:

  1. the competent body(ies) involved in its management and/or safeguarding;
  2. the organization(s) of the community or group concerned with the element and its safeguarding.

The competent bodies involved in management and facilitating Safeguarding Empaako element include; Engabu Za Tooro – Tooro Youth Platform for Action, a 15 years old cultural NGO, accredited to the IGC of the 2003 UNESCO convention. The second is the Department of Culture and Family Affairs of the Ministry of Gender Labour and Social Development.

The community organizations concerned with Empaako element include, the 44 clan institutions currently having a monthly clans representative forum on the safeguarding concerns, Tooro Kingdom, Bunyoro Kingdom and Banyabindi culture and Development Trust.

B.6. Participation of communities in preparing this report

Describe the measures taken to ensure the widest possible participation of the communities, groups and, where applicable, individuals concerned as well as relevant non-governmental organizations during the process of preparation of this report.

A facilitator was identified by the implementing organization to coordinate and compile this report with the participation of the communities.
Updating meetings were organized by the leaders of the participating community institutions in the five participating communities. These leaders included the Executive of Banyabindi Culture and Development Trust, Ekoomi ya Batuku and contact persons for Batagwenda, Tooro Kingdom and Bunyoro Kingdom. The meetings facilitated by the expert, generated information on what the communities feel they have accomplished and the challenges that were met. This information fed into the draft report which was sent back to the communities through their contact persons for comments. The comments received from the communities were considered before a final draft was compiled. The established monthly clan representative forum that convene in Fort-Portal discussed this first report as an agenda item on two sittings. The first meeting generated information for the report and the second considered the draft report. Through the activities executives the staff of the Ministry of Gender Labour and Social Development independently collected information provided by the communities which also fed into the process of report development.

C. Signature on behalf of the state party

The report should conclude with the original signature of the official empowered to sign it on behalf of the State, together with his or her name, title and the date of submission.

Name

Naumo Juliana Akoryo

Title

For: PERMANENT SECRETARY

Date

18-03-2015

Signature


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