6 April: International Day of Sport for Development and Peace

  • 1 April 2021
Two practitioners of Taekkyeon, a traditional Korean martial art
Two practitioners of Taekkyeon, a traditional Korean martial art
© 1998 by Cultural Heritage Administration

Tuesday 6th April marks the International Day of Sport for Development and Peace, an occasion to explore the range of traditional sports and games inscribed on the lists of the 2003 Convention.

Sport can help promote fairness, teambuilding, equality, inclusion and perseverance. Moreover, sport and physical activity can also help us get through times of crisis by reducing anxieties, improving physical and mental health, and strengthening social ties.

The lists of the 2003 Convention for the safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage include many elements related to traditional sports and games and which are anchored in our daily lives and our feeling of belonging to a wider group.

These elements related to traditional sports and games constitute one of the many illustrations of the entanglement of living heritage and sustainable development, particularly with good health and well-being (Sustainable Development Goal 3).

Join us in celebrating those traditions and in enjoying healthy practices !

We follow the United Nations in promoting the #OnlyTogether campaign. Until Tuesday, 6 April, we ask you to share on your social media platforms a picture or video showing the value of sport in your life. We ask that you use the hashtags #OnlyTogether, #SportDay and #LivingHeritage.

If you are ever in need of inspiration, browse through our photo gallery below !

#OnlyTogether, a United Nations’ online campaign organized for the International Day of Sport for Development and Peace 2021
Entraînement de la yole martiniquaise, Le Robert Read more on the element
Chen Peiju (right), a representative bearer of the Chen School Taijiquan, practices tuishou (hand-pushing skills) with her apprentice Read more on the element
Escalade hivernale - bassin d’Argentière Read more on the element
Movement of Silat by practitioners Read more on the element
Horseback Kabak shooting Read more on the element
Hurling Read more on the element
Every region has assimilated the Pencak Silat traditions with their local culture, such as types of accompaniment music along with the musical instrument, costumes, forms of oral tradition and expressions, weapons, etc. without removing the values of Pencak Silat. Read more on the element
Chidaoba, wrestling in Georgia Read more on the element
Horse and camel Ardhah Read more on the element
Tha-mula bandha (nauli) with Tha-uddiyana bandha Internal yogic locks (bandhas) have some structural functions, but primarily they are energetic in nature, and on a very tangible level they regulate the flow of blood through the body. Anatomically a bandha is the co-activation (simultaneous tensing) or opposing muscles around a joint complex. Read more on the element
Equitation in the French tradition Read more on the element
Capoeira circle Read more on the element
Pahlevani and Zoorkhanei rituals Read more on the element
Naadam, Mongolian traditional festival Read more on the element
Taekkyeon, a traditional Korean martial art Read more on the element
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