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4 organisations ou institutions correspondent à votre recherche
Nom, adresse et sourceActivités relatives au PCI
American Folklore Society
1501 Neil Avenue
Columbus OH 43201-2602
ÉTATS-UNIS D'AMÉRIQUE
URL: www.afsnet.org
Tel.: 614-292-3375

Prochain rapport prévu en 2019
Renouvelé en 2015 (Rapport d'activité : anglais)
Accrédité en 2010 (Demande : anglais) - n° 90110
Réunion décisionnaire : 3.GA - 2010

Date de création: 1978
Domaine(s):

- oral traditions and expressions
- performing arts
- social practices, rituals and festive events
- knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe
- traditional craftsmanship

Mesure de sauvegarde:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection

Objectifs:
The objectives of the American Folklore Society are to stimulate and encourage interest and research in folklore in all its aspects; to aid in the dissemination of the results of such research; to promote responsible application of such research in the broad variety of settings in which folklorists work; to publish and distribute publications, reports and journals; to serve as a bond among those interested in the study of folklore; to advocate for and assist the teaching of folklore and the establishment of folklore curricula and programs at all age levels in all educational contexts; to enhance the professional well-being of the Society’s members; and to engage in such other activities as are consonant with the foregoing purposes.
Activités:
The American Folklore Society:
1. Publishes the quarterly Journal of American Folklore, begun in 1888 and one of the oldest and most respected folklore journals in the world, which publishes the results of folklore research conducted throughout the world
2. Produces an annual meeting each October that brings together more than 700 folklorists from around the world to exchange work and ideas, and to create and strengthen friendships and working relationships
3. Maintains the AFS web site as a means for communication among Society members and between folklorists and the world at large
4. Serves as the hub of our diverse field, developing means of communication and offering professional development opportunities not offered by other organizations
5. Prepares position statements and policy documents on a variety of cultural, educational, and professional issues, as part of an ongoing program of advocacy for traditional cultural expression and the work of folklorists
6. Supports the work of 6 committees and some 30 interest-group sections
7. Awards prizes, travel stipends, and other forms of recognition and support for outstanding work and best practices
8. Maintains active partnerships with other societies in the American Council of Learned Societies and the National Humanities Alliance
9. Takes a leading role in national and international folklore projects, such as the H-Folk international folklore scholarship listserv and the development of an ethnographic thesaurus, and in international deliberations concerning folklore, intellectual property, and intangible cultural heritage

Coopération:
For many years, our Society has cooperated in several ways in a spirit of mutual respect with communities, groups, and individuals that create, maintain, and transmit intangible cultural heritage.

We provide financial support to enable a number of community-based artists, performers, practitioners, and scholars to attend our annual conferences. We give significant places on the programs of those conferences to those individuals, and to the communities and groups they represent, to discuss their traditional cultural expressions as well as the issues that face them as they seek to maintain and transmit their intangible cultural heritage. For example, at our 2007 annual meeting in Québec, representatives from a number of Canadian and US First Nations and other indigenous communities took part; in 2008 in Louisville community scholars and practitioners from African, African American, and Appalachian communities; and at our 2009 annual meeting in Idaho we will sponsor sessions featuring representatives from Latino, Native American, Basque, farming, and ranching communities throughout the western US.

We have an ongoing committee (the American Folklore Society Cultural Diversity Task Force) that works to bring such community-based representatives into long-term membership and active participation in our Society.

We also provide technical assistance grants throughout the year to communities and groups to support consultancies, meetings, and other activities that will help them pursue their intangible cultural heritage documentation and preservation efforts. Projects we have supported include efforts by indigenous artists to protect the supply of plant items that are essential to their craft traditions, and gatherings of traditional cultural leaders of immigrant communities to discuss means of effectively preserving and transmitting their intangible cultural heritage in their new homelands.

Since 2002, the Society has also been an accredited NGO member of the World Intellectual Property Organization's Intergovernmental Committee on Intellectual Property and Genetic Resources, Traditional Knowledge, and Folklore (IGC-GRTKF). In that body we cooperate with other culturally based NGOs, including those representing particular indigenous communities, on meeting presentations and other activities of mutual interest.
Center for Traditional Music and Dance
32 Broadway, Suite 1314
New York, NY 10004
ÉTATS-UNIS D'AMÉRIQUE
URL: www.ctmd.org
Tel.: +1-212 571 1555

Prochain rapport prévu en 2019
Renouvelé en 2015 (Rapport d'activité : anglais)
Accrédité en 2010 (Demande : anglais) - n° 90003
Réunion décisionnaire : 3.GA - 2010

Date de création: 1968
Domaine(s):

- performing arts
- social practices, rituals and festive events

Mesure de sauvegarde:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- transmission, (non-)formal education
- revitalization
- Publications: audio & vidao recordings, written publications

Pays principaux d'activité:

États-Unis d'Amérique

Objectifs:
Founded in 1968, the Center for Traditional Music and Dance, one of the US'premier traditional arts organizations, is dedicated to maintaing the vibrancy of the performing arts traditions of ethnic and imigrant communities through grass-roots community organizing, research-based educational programming and public performances.
Activités:
Since its founding in 1968, CTMD has produced over 900 major presentations including concerts, festivals, tours, CD and fim series, and lectures. Materials gathered by CTMD staff, folklorists, ethnomusicologists and community cultural sepcialists are the basis for subsequent articistic presentations and educational programming. CTMD-produced recordings, publications, and documentary films preserve and document cultural traditions and educate the public about the rich artistic heritage of New York's diverse immigrant/ethnic communities. Annually serving more than 100,000 artists, immigrant/ethnic community, and general audience members, CTMD's programs have a positive impact to ensure that the artistic traditions, which define a commuity, continue to exist and have contemporary meaning for successive generations. Activities include:

- Community Cultural Initiatives - multi-year field research and presentation projects which help community and cultural activists, artists and educators within targeted immigrant/ethnic communities to preserve their cultural traditions;

- An-Sky Institute for Jewish Culture -a partnership with New York University, the JCC in Manhattan, the Workmen's Circle and the Center for Jewish History to research and revitalize the practice of traditional East European Jewish performing arts;

- Masters on Stage -ongoing partnerships with major intitutions (i.e., Linclon Center, New York Historical Society, American Museum of Natural History, the Smithsonian Institution) that are designed to introduce leading practitioners of New York's rich immigrant expressive traditions to wider audiences;

- New York World Festival -a biannual event devoted each time to a different region of the worls. Celebrating New York as the most culturally diverse city in the world, the festival acknowledges the vitality of immigrant and ethnic performing arts and their contributions to the New York City landscape;

- Touring Artists -a fee-based program designated to promote community -based artists and assit these artists access mainstream performance venues and media;

- Archives/Dissemination -over the past thirty-five years, through extensive fieldwork and research, the Center has assembled one of the largest collections of urban immigrant and ethnic music anywhere in America. The collection includes audio and video recordings, photographic documentation and related ephemera on CTMD's presentations and programs. Sound and video recordings are published through CTMS's Ethnic Heritage Recording Series and the Global Beat of the Boroughs series in partnership with Smithsonian Folkways. A monthly eNewsletter provides news, events and informatin about NY's traditional music and dance scene.

CTMD's programs and intiatives help build the cultural infrastructure within immigrant/ethnic communities by bolstering immigrant/etchnic artistic traditions within the communituy and introducing these time-honored and continually evolving traditions to larger, more diverse audiences.

Coopération:
Through its innovative Community Cultural Initiatives (CCI) program, CTMD has worked in partnership with artists, educators and traditional arts advocates to conduct multi-year research, documentation and presentation programs in a number of New York City-based immigrant groups, including the Albanian, Arab, Dominican Irish, Indo-Caribbean, Central Asian, Chinese, Phillipino, Peruvian, Soviet Jewish, Ukrainian, Mexican and West African communities. While CCIs are deeply grassroots and NY-based, they produce ripples that can extend nationally and even internationally. In the 1970s, CTMD's project to document and present Jewish klezmer music helped spark a workd-wide revival. In the 1980s, CTMD helped form the renowned all-women's ensemble Cherish the Ladies which ispired huge interest amongs women across North America ane even Ireland in performing Irish music (previsously a male-dominated activity). In the 1990s, CTMD was the first organization to introduce Indian Bhangra music to the US. And, in the last five years, CCIs have generated the first Mariachi academy on the East Coast as well as the first Peruvian music and dance school for youth in the US.
International Organization of Folk Arts (IOV)
Comité international des arts et traditions populaires - IOV [fr]
International Organization of Folk Art - IOV [en]
P O Box 4043
Sequim, WA 98382

ÉTATS-UNIS D'AMÉRIQUE
URL: www.iov-world.com
Tel.: 360 582 0712

Prochain rapport prévu en 2019
Renouvelé en 2015 (Rapport d'activité : anglais)
Accrédité en 2010 (Demande : anglais) - n° 90154
Réunion décisionnaire : 3.GA - 2010

Date de création: 1979
Domaine(s):

- oral traditions and expressions
- performing arts
- social practices, rituals and festive events
- knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe
- traditional craftsmanship

Mesure de sauvegarde:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- transmission, (non-)formal education
- revitalization
- other
- Safeguarding through use of IP law tools

Objectifs:
IOV is a worldwide organization of individuals and institutions organized for the purposes of documenting, preserving and promoting all forms of folk art, both tangible and intangible. The UNESCO Convention on the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage, with an emphasis on inventory making, research and documentation, is the frame of reference for many IOV projects and programs.
IOV encourages and supports scholarly and scientific research, documentation and publication on topics related to all five domains of the ICH; supports national and international folk art festivals and events; and coordinates exchanges among practitioners of folk art, including performing folk arts troupes and handicraft artisans; Through its commissions, IOV coordinates the work of experts worldwide in performing arts, crafts, festivals and events, traditional food, oral traditions including folk tales myths and legends and folk costumes
The objectives of the IOV International Commission on Scientific Research, with regional and national commissions in many areas and countries, include bringing together leading experts in folk art to collaborate on projects, symposia and conferences and publish proceedings on conferences and symposia. Through its scholarly journal Folk Culture, published quarterly in Bahrain and distributed to universities, libraries and cultural centers worldwide, the Commission on Scientific Research provides a forum where experts may submit for publication important works on folk art, folk culture and other topics within the domains of the Intangible Cultural Heritage. Similar publications, as well as a newsletter either are, or will soon be, published in the languages of UNESCO. IOV believes that in order for the intangible cultural heritage to survive, it must evolve and meet the needs of people today. Consequently, IOV supports innovative ways to interest the youth in folk dance, music, song and costumes as a way of preserving and promoting folk art and ICH
IOV encourages democracy by requiring open elections of officers, executive board and presidential council members. Policy is made by the Presidential Council and ratified by the General Assembly. Officers and members of the Executive Board and Presidential Council are elected by the General Assembly. National sections hold democratic elections every two years.
IOV recognizes the importance of preserving folk culture and intangible cultural heritage by seeking to involve a broad coalition of individuals and organizations at all levels of society and from all strata of the population. To accomplish this objective, IOV has implemented a policy of nondiscrimination that welcomes all who wish to participate. Membership fees accommodations are given to those who are financially disadvantaged. IOV adheres to the WANGO Code of Ethics, adopted in 2008. A principle objective is to cooperate and coordinate our work with that of other NGOs in order to avoid duplication, as well as to conserve human and financial resources.
IOV encourages youth participation through its International Youth Commission, which currently includes over 120 members from 45 nations. World youth congresses are held biennually. The first was in 2008 and the second will take place in 2010 in Nanjing, China. IOV members commit to support the objectives of both UNESCO and IOV.

Activités:
IOV FIRST WORLD YOUTH CONGRESS: Bountiful, Utah, August 2008 brought together 120 young delegates and 350 observers from 40 nations for five days of lectures, demonstrations and workshops on ICH. The theme was "Living Traditions: Safeguarding the Intangible Cultural Heritage." Fifty lectures and presentations focused on the 5 domains of ICH, traditional knowledge and Expressions of Culture were presented. A folk art festival attended by over 12,000 plus 350 folk dancers and musicians from 10 nations provided a venue for presentation of folk art; HIGHLIGHTS included exhibits from China (Nanjing YunJin Silk Brocade Research Institute) and Azerbaijan (National Culinary Institute of Azerbaijan).
During the past four years, IOV has opened offices with full or part-time paid staff in Bahrain (2007), Nigeria (2005), USA (2009), and China (2009) Beijing, Shanghai, Nanjing). Offices with part or full-time staff continue to operate in Brazil, Russia,
The Secretariat, in Austria, is staffed by the Secretary-General, a full-time Assistant, one part-time Bookkeeper and a part-time Treasurer. Since the death of IOV Founder Alexander Veigl in December 2008, the Secretariat has given priority to the job of updating membership data.
2009, IOV national sections established in Spain, Costa Rica and Puerto Rico.
2009, CONFERENCE ON FOLK TALES, MYTHS AND LEGENDS, held in Manila, Philippines with international participation explored ways of identifying and preserving oral traditions. IOV publishes an extensive calender of folk festivals each year, publishes a semi-annual newsletter, maintains a web site at www.iov-world.com and will soon open an online folk art market for selling handicrafts (proceeds to support the crafts makers). Similar activities are carried on in national sections.
2009, PEACE IN THE AMERICAS Conference and Youth Forum, to be in Santos, Brazil in August 2009, organized by ABROSOFFA, the IOV Brazil National Section. Representatives from 15 countries will explore the theme "Achieving a Culture of Peace: Folk Art Projects that Work."
2007-2009 IOV Quarterly Journal "Folk Culture," a peer-reviewed Arabic language, academic and scientific journal published in Bahrain (abstracted in English and French), is devoted to ICH of the Arab States. Now in 9th edition. Support is provided by the King of Bahrain, Ministry of Information, and the IOV Regional Office for the Middle East.
2009, in April, IOV held joint meetings with The National Folk Organization of the USA (2009).
2010, IOV INDIA CONFERENCE ON THE INTANGIBLE CULTURAL HERITAGE being organized in Baruda, India in October 2010 by IOV India, with cooperation of the Indian National UNESCO Commission, Universitiu of Baroda, Prof. Dr. Parul Shah, Chair.
2007, IOV World Congress and General Assembly in Volos, Greece, 2007, organized by IOV Hellas Section, brought representatives from 80 nations together to approve new IOV projects and the annual budget, and to elect officers and directors. An international conference on the topic "Cultural Dialogue In the Context of Globalization" was held concurrently with the GA, which included performances by folk art troupes.
2009, IOV received trademark protection for its name and logo from the US Patent and Trademark Office in June, 2009.
2009, IOV China Section was officially established with a full-time Executive Director and four paid staff members. Significant recent accomplishments in China include:
- 2009, the IOV China Section was founded and legally recognized;
- 2008, Youth delegation of 12 individual participate in First IOV World Youth Congress, in Utah, USA;
- 2008 Nanjing YunJin Brocade Brocade Research Institute received a delegation from IOV to consult on ICH project;
- 2008 Nanjing YunJin participated in an IOV sponsored exchange with the USA and sent a loom and delegation to demonstrate silk brocade weaving at the IOV World Youth Congress in Utah, USA;
- 2008 IOV Secretary-General Hans J. Holz becomes the 69th torch bearer in Olympic Relay in Nanjing, China by invitation of Beijing Olympic Committee;
- 2009, City of Nanjing agreed to host the Second IOV World Youth Congress in October of 2010 with budget of approximately $US 200,000.00 and participation of 300 youth from 150 nations;
- October 2009: IOV China will host a conference with the theme “Protecting the Endangered Cultures of Minority Populations” in Chengdu. IOV China Section will bring to China approximately 30 experts to present papers and participate in discussions.
In 2008, IOV Established an International Commission on Traditional Theatre chaired by Valery Khazanov (Russia). In July of 2009, the IOV Scientific Research Commission for Central Europe will meet in Belorus and approve its working plan for 2009-2010.

Coopération:
IOV has thirty years of experience cooperating with national UNESCO commissions other NGOs working in the Culture Sector. In particular, IOV has supported the work of academicians, scientists and professional folklorists from the time the first IOV Science and Research Commission was founded 20 years ago. In 2005, IOV had, as members of 17 commissions, 280 professional folklorists and academic experts specializing in traditional food, handicrafts, dance research, traditional music, puppetry, theater, myths and lengends, and other categories within ICH. (These commissions exist now on the national and regional level as a result of a decentralization in 2007). Many of these individuals had the backing of universities and institutions, which frequently are IOV's partners in organizing conferences and lectures. IOV has also worked with governmental bodies to sponsor folk dance and music festivals, as well as other folk art events.
IOV's mission, in part, is to help smaller or less well established NGOs working in the areas of folk art further their missions. IOV has also cooperated with large NGOs. IOV held joint meetings with CIOFF in 2005, organized by the Russian National House of Folk Art, which represents both organizations in Russia. On the national level, particularly in the area of festival organizing, IOV and CIOFF work together. ;
IOV works closely with national UNESCO Commissions in many countries where it is not uncommon to find the same individuals working in both organizations. For example, in the Philippines, IOV President Carmen Padilla is also the head of the Cultural Section of the Philippine National UNESCO Commission. In Bulgaria, Prof. Mila Santova has been head of the Bulgarian National UNESCO Commission and Chair of the IOV Science and Research Commission. Elvira Kunina is head of the Russian National UNESCO Commission and Vice-president of IOV. In 2005, she arranged a joint meeting of IOV and CIOFF in Novgorod.
In the USA, there is a close cooperative relationship between the National Folk Association and IOV. In 2008, the two organizations worked together to sponsor an international conference on Safeguarding the Intangible Cultural Heritage where 40 countries sent participants. In Bulgaria, Dr. Mila Santova, an IOV member and co-chair of the IOV Scientific Commission has led efforts to create the national inventory of ICH. In the Philippines, IOV recently co-sponsored a conference on folktales, myths and legends together with the Philippine National UNESCO Commission. IOV has had similar success working with national UNESCO commissions in Romania, India, South Korea, and other countries. In China, the China Federation of Literary and Arts Circles, CFLAC, and IOV have worked together to organize folkloric festivals in various parts of China, including Beijing, Xian, Hongzhou, Weifang, Boashan and Shanghai.
IOV National Sections should report to their National UNESCO Commissions at least annually. In 2009, IOV submitted its annual report to UNESCO Director General, ICH Section, Culture Sector, NGO Relations, US National UNESCO Commission, the Philippine National UNESCO Commission, and others. IOV works with many national and international NGOs, IGOs and private enterprise to support events and projects in a number of countries.
Through a Scholarship named to honor the founders of IOV, deserving young people who are economically disadvantaged are given assistance for travel to conferences that will further their careers in folk art.
Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
600 Maryland Avenue, SW, Suite 2001
Washington DC 20010
ÉTATS-UNIS D'AMÉRIQUE
URL: www.folklife.si.edu
Tel.: +1-202-633-1141

Prochain rapport prévu en 2023
Accrédité en 2018 (Demande : anglais) - n° 90391
Réunion décisionnaire : 7.GA - 2018

Date de création: 1967
Domaine(s):

- oral traditions and expressions
- performing arts
- social practices, rituals and festive events
- knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe
- traditional craftsmanship
- other
- foodways

Mesure de sauvegarde:

- identification, documentation, research (including inventory-making)
- preservation, protection
- promotion, enhancement
- transmission, (non-)formal education
- revitalization
- other
- developing a research-based ecological approach to cultural sustainability

Pays principaux d'activité:

Arménie, Bhoutan, Chine, Équateur, Espagne, États-Unis d'Amérique, Kenya, Mexique, Pérou

Objectifs:
As the largest museum, research, and education complex in the world, the Smithsonian Institution is well known for its collections of more than 154 million objects. The Smithsonian's Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage is the institution's leading force for safeguarding the diversity of intangible cultural heritage. The current strategic plan of the center outlines three major objectives. Each objective is built on the foundation of safeguarding intangible cultural heritage, an effort actively engage by the center by promoting greater understanding and sustainability of cultural heritage across the United States and around the world through research, education, and community engagement:
- Expand understanding of diverse living cultures
The center bridges research and practice; seeks to enrich knowledge of intangible cultural heritage, creativity, and diversity; and uses that knowledge to provide engaging, practical trainings for the next generation of intangible cultural heritage professionals. Our research efforts are paralleled by our commitment to strengthen the stewardship, accessibility, and impact of intangible cultural heritage collections.
- Invite public engagement in cultural practice and exchange
The Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage uses multiple methods of public engagement - the annual Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Smithsonian Folkways Recordings, and over 100 million annual visitors to our digital platforms – to spark discovery, support sharing, and deepen knowledge about intangible cultural heritage.
- Champion cultural vitality and sustainability.
The center promotes the widespread recognition of the value of traditions, supporting not only their preservation but also their long-term sustainability. Our ecological approach to cultural sustainability means that we work with communities to holistically assess the status of intangible cultural heritage and collaboratively develop trainings and other project-based activities to foster supportive conditions to sustain heritage in line with the community's own long-term vision.

Activités:
Each of the Center's core departments - the Folklife Festival, Smithsonian Folkways Recordings, Cultural Sustainability Initiatives, Research and Education, and Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives – plays an important role in safeguarding intangible cultural heritage.
Celebrating its fiftieth anniversary in 2017, the Center's Festival department produces the annual research-based Smithsonian Folklife Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Each year, the Festival brings more than 200 tradition bearers from the United States and around the world to share their music and dance, storytelling, craftsmanship, foodways, knowledge systems, and oral traditions with hundreds of thousands of visitors. The Festival plays an important role in the research, documentation, and promotion of intangible cultural heritage. For example, in 2013, the One World, Many Voices: Endangered Languages and Cultural Heritage program highlighted thirteen communities from around the world to share their efforts to revitalize and maintain their most important cultural practices.
As the nonprofit record label of the Smithsonian Institution, Smithsonian Folkways Recordings is dedicated to supporting cultural diversity and increased understanding among peoples through the documentation, preservation, and dissemination of sound. Folkways provides online access to tens of thousands of audio recordings and hundreds of video features from the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives of the Center, as well as collections from partner archives including the International Library of African Music at Willard Rhodes University in South Africa, the Archives and Research Centre for Ethnomusicology of the American Institute for Indian Studies in India, and the Aga Khan Music Initiative for Central Asia. In addition, the Center offers tools for teaching, in-depth feature articles, and individual subscriptions. The label provides unparalleled access to seldom heard voices of people from all over the world. In 2014, we also began to distribute the UNESCO Collection of Traditional Music. Folkways plays an important role in the documentation, research, preservation, promotion, transmission (through formal and non-formal education), and, at times, the revitalization of intangible cultural heritage.
Cultural Sustainability Initiatives is the newest department of the Center, building on a research-based ecological approach to cultural sustainability and working with communities to identify interventions to strengthen the sustainability of their traditions. In China, the work carried out by the Center with ethnic Tibetans supports language documentation and training, intangible cultural heritage documentation, and artisan craft documentation and development. In Armenia, the Center launched the first international fellows program at the Smithsonian, in partnership with the Armenian Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography. Using this ethnographic research as a foundation, the Center is piloting an innovative model of community-based tourism that keeps representation and revenues in the hands of communities and tradition bearers. Specific cultural sustainability initiatives are grounded in documentation and research, but they play an even more critical role in providing solutions for enhancement, transmission, and revitalization of intangible cultural heritage.
Finally, Research and Education and the Ralph Rinzler Folklife Archives are essential and fundamental components of the Center's work. In particular, the Rinzler Archives play a critical role in preservation of intangible cultural heritage. lt contains the Frances and Moses Asch Collection, recognized by UNESCO as Memory of the World in 2015.

Coopération:
As outlined in the Convention for Safeguarding Intangible Cultural Heritage, the Center maintains that communities should have the primary role in safeguarding their own intangible cultural heritage. The work carried out by the Center is rooted in the principle of cultural democracy - the exercise of the right of free expression by diverse individuals and communities as they document, preserve and share the cultural traditions that matter most to them. Most of the Center's research is community-driven, community-based, and relies on the collaborative participation of local stakeholders. Recognizing that cultural heritage should not be subject to external judgments of value or worth, this approach is vital to ensure that the community's culture is respected and the Center's values are upheld. The nature of this work requires that the Center staff members maintain strong, long-standing relationships with both individual tradition bearers and organizations around the world. This network enriches the Center's scholarship, programs, and projects.
Principles of community engagement and mutual respect are applied in each of the Center’s areas of work. The Festival programs are conceptualized in direct and mutual collaboration with participants – each program has a curator from the Center and a curator from the community. The Center engage directly with each tradition bearer participating in the Festival, working toward a shared vision for their experience, which includes not only providing a platform for their work but attention to critical details like lodging, transportation, meals, and adequate rest. The staffing swells to nearly 250 people during the Festival, including a team of participant coordinators, interns, and volunteers to ensure a positive and successful experience for participating tradition bearers.
For Smithsonian Folkways Recordings, artist rights and royalties are central. Folkways staff spend a significant amount of effort ensuring that artists are compensated fairly and in compliance with contracts. In 2016, we paid more than $600,000 in artist royalties.
Finally, Cultural Sustainability Initiatives are driven by community-identified objectives, and grounded in community-based research. Each activity has a local partner counterpoint and the Center focuses significant effort on providing broad and equitable access through the creation and distribution of local language materials.
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